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Indonesia to hike pay for domestic helpers in Taiwan

Indonesia to hike pay for domestic helpers in Taiwan

Jakarta, July 26 (CNA) Indonesia is going ahead with a plan to raise wages for its domestic helpers in Taiwan, as the negotiations between the two countries on the issue have not produced any concrete decisions, an Indonesian official told CNA recently.
Taiwan had requested that Indonesia hold off on the pay increase but Agusdin Subiantoro, deputy director of Indonesia's Agency for the Placement and Protection of Indonesian Migrant Workers (APPIMW), said the wait has been "too long."
He said the APPIMW and the Indonesian Economic and Trade Office to Taipei are discussing the matter and will come up with a workable plan that will reflect fluctuations in currency exchange.
Indonesia decided to proceed with the wage increase for domestic helpers because its many rounds of meetings with Taiwan on the issue have not yielded any consensus, Subiantoro told CNA in a recent interview.
Not only Indonesia, but the governments of Vietnam and the Philippines have decided to raise wages for their domestic helpers in Taiwan, Subiantoro said. Indonesia and the Philippines informed Taiwan earlier this month that they had decided to increase the monthly wage for their domestic helpers in Taiwan from the current NT$15,840 to NT$17,500 (US$556).
Taiwan's Ministry of Labor protested the move by the two countries and asked that they delay implementation of the policy until they could reach an agreement with Taiwan on the issue.
On July 1, Taiwan implemented a minimum monthly wage increase from 19,273 to NT$20,008 but foreign domestic workers were not included because their pay is not covered by the country's Labor Standards Act.
Taiwan has argued that if the cost of providing food and lodging for foreign domestic workers was taken into consideration, their pay would be close to the local minimum wage.
Indonesia, with about 210,000 employees in Taiwan, is the leading supplier of migrant workers to Taiwan, followed by Vietnam, Thailand and the Philippines, according to an ANTARA News report.
Nearly 15 percent of Indonesian migrant workers are employed in the manufacturing and construction sector, 80 percent work as domestic helpers, and 3-4 percent as ship crew members. (By Jay Chou and Flor Wang)


Updated : 2021-09-23 21:05 GMT+08:00