Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Indonesia, Philippines asked to hold off on salary demands (update)

Indonesia, Philippines asked to hold off on salary demands (update)

Taipei, July 6 (CNA) The Ministry of Labor (MOL) on Monday asked Indonesia and the Philippines to suspend their demand for salary increases for their domestic workers in Taiwan, saying Taiwan had yet to reach a consensus on such hikes with the two governments. In a press release Monday, the MOL said the Indonesian and Filipino governments have "unilaterally" raised the monthly wage for their domestic workers in Taiwan from NT$15,840 (US$512) to NT$17,500, beginning July 1. Since July 1, the Indonesian Economic and Trade Office to Taipei has refused to verify employers' applications for domestic workers unless they agree to offer a monthly wage of NT$17,500 to the workers, the MOL said. The Manila Economic and Cultural Office has also tried to get Taiwanese employers to increase their salaries for domestic workers by interviewing employers or postponing the screening of their applications, according to the MOL. The ministry said the actions of the Indonesian and Filipino governments have "seriously affected the rights of employers." It said it has sent official letters to the Indonesian and Filipino offices, requesting that they suspend their wage hike measures before reaching a consensus with Taiwan on the issue. The two offices, which represent Indonesian and Filipino interests in Taiwan in the absence of bilateral diplomatic ties, were not immediately available for comment. The minimum monthly wage in Taiwan was recently raised to NT$20,008 on July 1, 2015, but foreign domestic workers in Taiwan are not paid the minimum because they are not protected by the country's Labor Standards Act. These workers and their governments have long protested over long working hours and low wages. Taiwan's government has argued, however, that if the food and lodging Taiwanese employers provide foreign domestic workers are taken into consideration, the total compensation they receive come close to the local minimum wage. Mai Jui-ming (???), a deputy section chief at the Taipei Economic and Trade Office in Jakarta, predicted that the Indonesian government's move could backfire and scare off Taiwanese employers who are hoping to hire Indonesian domestic workers. He said his office will discuss the issue with Indonesian authorities and try to reach a consensus. There are currently over 220,000 foreign domestic workers and caregivers in Taiwan, most of them from Indonesia. (By Christie Chen and Jay Chou)


Updated : 2021-09-29 01:51 GMT+08:00