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Beijing demands DPP clarification of 'status quo'

Beijing demands DPP clarification of 'status quo'

Taipei, May 27 (CNA) Beijing Wednesday demanded that opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) Chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen (???) expound upon what she meant when she said she would "maintain the status quo" if elected president of the Republic of China next year.
Fan Liqing (???), spokeswoman for China's Taiwan Affairs Office under the State Council, made the demand when answering questions from media at a regular news briefing.
"The two sides of the Taiwan Strait have remained under separate rule since 1949, but it won't change the fact that the mainland and Taiwan belong to 'one China,'" Fan said. "China's sovereignty and territory cannot be axed. Since 2008, peaceful development of cross-strait relations has been possible based on the '1992 consensus,' which is the status quo between the two sides." "As the DPP has mentioned that it would seek to maintain the status quo, all sectors in Taiwan are wondering what the party means when it refers to this term. This is something that they must give a clear explanation for," Fan said.
As President Ma ying-jeou (???) will finish his second four- year term in May 2016, cross-strait ties have again emerged as a hot topic among the parties concerned as the January presidential polls approach.
Although Tsai, who has been nominated by the DPP to run in the next presidential election, seems to stand a better chance of winning the polls following the ruling Kuomintang's humiliating defeat in local elections late last year, her stance toward Taiwan's relations with China has sparked concern in Beijing and Washington, both of which have reiterated that peaceful development in cross-strait ties is key to stability and prosperity in the region.
Chinese President Xi Jinping has threatened that cross-strait relations will crumble if the "1992 consensus" is no longer recognized by the Taiwan administration.
The pro-independence DPP has long denied the existence of the "1992 consensus," which stipulates that there is only 'one China,' with the two sides of the strait free to interpret what that means.
(By S.P. Yeh and Flor Wang)


Updated : 2021-09-18 21:13 GMT+08:00