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China no longer safe hideout for Taiwanese criminals: President Ma

China no longer safe hideout for Taiwanese criminals: President Ma

Taipei, April 24 (CNA) Cooperation between the two sides of the Taiwan Strait on stemming criminal activities is making it harder for Taiwanese criminals to hide from the law, President Ma Ying-jeou (???) said Friday in praise of achievements from the cross-strait joint crime-fighting agreement. Since the agreement was signed in April 2009, it "has obviously left many Taiwanese criminals with no place to hide," Ma said in a celebration held by the Ministry of Justice for the sixth anniversary of the signing of the "Cross-strait Joint Crime-Fighting and Judicial Mutual Assistance Agreement." "In the past, (the criminals) used to think they would be out of the law's reach once fleeing to the mainland. Now, the situation is entirely different," Ma said. According to Ma, the competent authorities of the two sides have asked for judicial assistance from the other side on a combined 67,000 cases since the agreement took effect, 55,000 of which were resolved. Such an accomplishment is "rare" elsewhere in the world, the president said. However, a handful of notorious economic criminals remain on the loose in China. "For those who have made investments in the mainland and pay a large amount of taxes every year, mainland authorities are hesitant (to repatriate them)," Ma said, "but we still hope the efforts will be continued." By 2014, Taiwan's population had increased by 2 million from the level in 1995, and yet the crime rate dropped by 30 percent during that period. He wishes the judicial system of the country keeps maintaining this good record, and helps people to see that the advantages of cross-strait relations are not just in the economic realm but also in social order, Ma said. Justice Minister Luo Ying-shay (???) said the two sides have jointly cracked 141 major crimes and arrested 6,288 suspects since the cross-strait joint crime-fight agreement was signed in 2009. Under the agreement for mutual judicial assistance, her ministry has managed to get five convicted Taiwanese nationals repatriated since 2014 so that they can serve in prisons in Taiwan, saving time and energy their families would otherwise spend in traveling between the two sides, Luo said. The Ministry of Justice had also dispatched prosecutors to the mainland on a mission to give lectures to Chinese judicial personnel in the hope that they will become more aware of legal procedures for extracting evidence during investigations, she added. (By Yin Chun-chieh and Elizabeth Hsu)


Updated : 2021-09-25 04:40 GMT+08:00