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China Times: Clinton will not change cross-strait situation

China Times: Clinton will not change cross-strait situation

Just as expected, Hillary Clinton finally announced this week that she is making a second run for the U.S. presidency. It appears that Clinton will have little problem winning the nomination of the Democratic Party this time. Based on her credentials and financial strength, she enjoys a high chance of becoming the first female president in American history. Her 2016 presidential bid, however, will not be easy. The Clinton Foundation, for example, has been criticized for receiving donations from foreign governments. Many voters also disapprove of the presidential bid by the former first lady. There is also controversy around Clinton's tenure as secretary of state. On the Sept. 11, 2012 attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya that killed U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens, the Republican Party slammed Clinton for ignoring security requests. Clinton has also come under fire for using a private email account when she was secretary of state. Despite these challenges, Clinton is very hopeful of winning the 2016 presidency, and one of her biggest strengths is her familiarity with foreign affairs. Clinton has talked about the U.S. China policy and cross-Taiwan Strait relations on many occasions. In addition to praising Taiwan for its democratic achievements, she said Washington, under its "one China policy," supports peaceful interaction between Taiwan and China, and is opposed to any threats to Taiwan's autonomy. During a meeting with then-Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi in 2011, Clinton said that cross-strait peace and stability meets the strategic interests of America and that she would like to see that series of interactions, trust and confidence across the strait increase and grow. Whoever might win the U.S. presidency, however, chances are getting lower and lower that Taiwan will be able to use the U.S. as leverage against China. Instead, Taiwan is likely to be put into a marginal position in U.S.-China interaction. Taiwan must not overly rely on the U.S. and needs to find its own way. (Editorial abstract -- April 16, 2015) (By Y.F. Low)


Updated : 2021-09-20 08:32 GMT+08:00