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Former presidential aide cries foul over double standards

Former presidential aide cries foul over double standards

Taipei, April 13 (CNA) Former National Security Council (NSC) Secretary-General King Pu-tsung (???) said Monday he has been judged with the double standards by his critics, while other opposition figures have remained unscathed after committing infractions.
During a radio show interview, King, long one of President Ma Ying-jeou's closest confidants, said he had behaved ethically throughout his political career while listing a number of infractions by other figures. During a private visit to Japan with his family last week, a number of insinuating reports had claimed that King had been on a secret mission on behalf of President Ma Ying-jeou, while a number of political talk show guests said that he was fleeing Taiwan. King denied all such allegations as unfounded last Wednesday. In the interview Wednesday, he cited Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) lawmaker Chiu Yi-ying (???), who kicked and damaged the door of then-Justice Minister Tseng Yung-fu (???) in 2013. "Would a regular civilian who had committed the same destruction of public property be spared the legal consequences?" King asked.
He also suggested suspected irregularities on the part of Peng Wen-cheng (???), an outspoken political talk show host who King said may be violating Ministry of Education guidelines because he is also a university professor. King said he too doubled as a radio show host during a stint teaching at a university but had to give up the secondary commitment because of outside criticism. King questioned whether Peng is in a position to launch allegations of abuse of privileges and suggested that the talk show host apply the same lofty standards to himself as he does to others. There have also been instances where elected officials had abused the privileges of their positions to void traffic tickets issued to their supporters, he charged.
"Our society is growing absurd," said King, who believes that history will prove his accusations right over time.
King said that while shedding light on corruption is a vital step in Taiwan's democratic progress, allegations must be backed by evidence, which none of his detractors have yet to produce. Without evidence, these unfounded allegations will only fuel discord and upheaval, he said. Asked whether he will do a tell-all memoir, King said he will wait until President Ma Ying-jeou has stepped down. Meanwhile, ruling Kuomintang lawmaker Tsai Cheng-yuan (???) on Monday urged Education Minister Wu Se-hwa (???) to investigate Peng's suspected infractions by working both as a talk show host and a university professor. Wu pledged that the ministry will begin reviewing related guidelines. He said existing regulations stipulate that university professors are allowed to teach no more than 8 hours a week at cram schools, provided they have received their school's permission. Tsai said it was unreasonable for university professors to be barred from teaching at cram schools but free to work as talk show hosts and criticize political figures. DPP lawmaker Tuan Yi-kang (???) stepped forth Monday afternoon to admit that he is the elected official mentioned by King who had voided traffic tickets. The incident took place about 15 or 16 years ago, when he was a member of the Taipei City Council. Tuan said that he had been reprimanded and had apologized for the incident during the time. The incident is also part of the reason why he has been riding scooters to get around instead of driving a car for the past decade, Tuan said. DPP lawmaker Chiu Yi-ying, however, remained remorseless over her action. "The reason why the case against me was dropped is because the government dared not go to the court to fight for its case," she posted on her Facebook page. (By Lee Shu-hua, Hsu Chih-wei and Ted Chen)


Updated : 2021-09-24 11:39 GMT+08:00