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Taiwan's status quo is that of sovereign, independent ROC: DPP member

Taiwan's status quo is that of sovereign, independent ROC: DPP member

Taipei, April 12 (CNA) The basis of maintaining Taiwan's status quo and its relations with China is the understanding that Taiwan is a sovereign, independent country constitutionally named the Republic of China, Hung Chi-chang (???), a senior member of the opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), said Sunday. His comment came in the wake of a statement Saturday by DPP Chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen (???), the DPP's presumptive presidential candidate for 2016, who said that the party's basic principle in handling cross-Taiwan Strait relations is "maintaining the status quo." Hung, who had served as Taiwan's top negotiator with China, said that maintaining the status quo in cross-strait relations is the consensus among the majority of people in Taiwan. It has also been the foundation for the co-existence of the ROC and the People's Republic of China (PRC) over the past 65 years and for the change from two belligerent forces to two separate governments, he said. "Therefore, the status quo is that 'Taiwan is a sovereign, independent country named the ROC,' according to the Constitution," Hung said. Maintaining the status quo in cross-strait relations means maintaining the current and existing state of affairs across the strait, Hung said in response to reporters' questions. Hung was attending the launch of a book titled "Facing On: Cross-Strait Future in the Scopes of Democratic Progressive Party Elites" facing DPP elites (??:??????????), by Tung Chen-yuan, a distinguished professor at National Chengchi University, In the book, Hung is quoted as saying that if the DPP returns to power in 2016, he hopes it will give up its pursuit of Taiwan's de jure independence and produce a new Republic of China Resolution in place of its current one that emphasizes Taiwan's independence from China. Hung told reporters that in discussions on de jure independence, the question is often raised of whether a radical or pragmatic approach should be adopted. In his view, he said, the pursuit of de jure independence means creating a new Constitution, establishing a new country, or unilaterally declaring Taiwan independence. Hung said he believes, therefore, that de jure independence is not a direction the DPP would wish to take as a responsible party if it returns to power. He noted that Tsai has said cross-strait ties mean Taiwan-China relations and do not equal ties between the Kuomintang and the Communist Party of China and that the DPP wants to play an active, responsible role in cross-strait relations. (By Lu Hsin-hui and Evelyn Kao)


Updated : 2021-09-18 19:48 GMT+08:00