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DPP will maintain status quo in Taiwan-China relations: chairwoman

DPP will maintain status quo in Taiwan-China relations: chairwoman

Taipei, April 9 (CNA) The main opposition Democratic Progressive Party's (DPP,???) basic principle in handling cross-Taiwan Strait relations is "maintaining the status quo," the party's chairwoman said during a party meeting Thursday, as she tried to ease concerns over the DPP's China policy ahead of next year's presidential race. Tsai Ing-wen (???)was quoted by DPP spokesman Cheng Yun-peng (???)as saying that she is confident of handling cross-strait ties well and will try to "avoid accidents" and will not provoke "contradictions, confrontations or conflicts." Tsai made her remarks during a closed-door meeting of the party's China policy committee, according to Cheng, when many people at home and overseas are concerned about the party's China policy. The spokesman quoted Tsai as saying that she has realized her responsibility in handling Taiwan's relations with China well should the DPP regains power in 2016, which she acknowledged is a "challenging task." By "maintaining cross-strait status quo," Cheng said Tsai means "keeping the existing peaceful development and bilateral consultations and exchanges" between the two sides of the strait. "This is the core of cross-strait relationship as well as a goal the DPP will strive to achieve after it returns to power (in 2016)," Tsai was quoted as saying. To achieve that, Tsai admitted that Beijing will have to shed its habit of looking at its relations with Taiwan from the perspective of the Communist Party of China and the Kuomintang (KMT) of Taiwan. Whichever party becomes Taiwan's ruling party, she said, cross- strait relations will definitely stay calm and stable if Beijing treats Taiwan as an "equal partner" in a friendly manner and works with Taiwan in "maintaining the status quo of peaceful development in bilateral ties and the status quo of bilateral consultations and exchanges." Tsai said both governments in China and in Taiwan must acknowledge they are in different stages of development, as Taiwan has developed into a "democratic and multicultural" society in which all political leaders must accomodate "different voices and stances" while seeking the "biggest possible consensus" domestically. "If both sides can reach such an understanding and jointly seek the biggest common denominator between them, there definitely will be a new possibility in cross-strait relations," she said. Turning to other countries' concerns about Taiwan's international responsibility over maintaining regional peace, Tsai said she "fully realizes and will seriously face" the issue. First and foremost among the countries, Tsai pointed to the United States, saying she would be more than pleased to "exchange views with the U.S. side on how we will handle cross-strait ties after we regain the ruling power in Taiwan." She noted that interactions with the U.S. in this regard will be on-going, "before and after the presidential elections in January, 2016." Tsai promised a "no surprise" policy toward the U.S. in regard to the DPP's cross-strait strategy, pledging to beef up mutual trust with the U.S. and ensure that such trust will act as a "positive factor" in maintaining peaceful development in Taiwan-China relations. A majority of the people in Taiwan hope to see a peaceful and stable development in cross-strait relations, while at the same time keeping their "democratic values and room for self-determinatin in the future," she said. Helping Taiwanese people realize such a hope is the DPP's "responsibility and firm commitment" as the party works to regain power, Tsai said. She added that her party will be able to keep peace and stability across the Taiwan Strait and "leave maximum space and choices to our next generation" in the midst of the complicated international situation. (By Sophia Yeh and S.C. Chang)


Updated : 2021-09-26 05:43 GMT+08:00