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DPP elder urges end of pursuit of Taiwan de jure independence

DPP elder urges end of pursuit of Taiwan de jure independence

Taipei, April 6 (CNA) Hung Chi-chang (???), a senior member of the opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) who has served as Taiwan's top negotiator with China, is hoping his party will give up its pursuit of Taiwan's de jure independence if it returns to power in 2016. In an interview for a new book on the DPP elite and future Taiwan-China relations, Hung hoped that his party declares ahead of the presidential election that it "will not pursue de jure independence" should it regain power, as it is favored to do. The book, partly compiled by National Chengchi University professor Tung Chen-yuan, features interviews with senior DPP members, DPP legislators and DPP heads of cities and counties on their views and suggestions on the party's China policy. Hung, who served as Straits Exchange Foundation chairman from 2007 to 2008 when the DPP was in power, called for his party to produce a new resolution in place of the current one that emphasizes Taiwan's independence from China. Hung said the adoption of a new "Republic of China Resolution" would result in changes to the Normal Country Resolution, which would be a test of the party's leadership and show how mature his party is. The party is facing several challenges, he said, including the controversy over free economic pilot zones, a major policy of the President Ma Ying-jeou administration that the DPP has blocked in the Legislature. He wondered whether DPP mayors and county chiefs will have reached a consensus on the project by 2016, as seven of the eight planned zones are in cities or counties governed by DPP leaders. Another challenge, Hung said, will be how his party deals with China, saying party members are divided on the existence of the 1992 consensus. The consensus, a backbone of the Ma administration's China policy, is a tacit agreement reached between Taiwan and China in 1992 that there is only "one China," with each side free to interpret its meaning. The DPP also lacks political mutual trust with China, Hung said. He suggested that the party hold talks with China and the United States before the 2016 presidential election to reach a new consensus on which the DPP can base its China policy when it takes power again. (By Lu Hsin-hui and Scully Hsiao)


Updated : 2021-09-26 18:46 GMT+08:00