Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Strike at Taiwan-invested plant in Vietnam expected to end soon

Strike at Taiwan-invested plant in Vietnam expected to end soon

Hanoi, March 31 (CNA) A strike at a Taiwan-invested plant in Vietnam is expected to come to an end after the Vietnamese authorities responded Tuesday to workers' anger about a proposed revision of the social insurance law. The law originally stated that workers are entitled to social insurance payments 12 months after leaving a job, but the revised law changes that to a payout only when workers reach retirement age -- 60 for men and 55 for women. The revised law disgruntled the workers at the Pou Yuen Vietnam facility (?????), which employs several thousand people, and they began a massive strike March 26 that affected the normal production of the plant. According to the online news network vnexpress.net, Doan Mau Diep, deputy minister of labor, invalids and social affairs, communicated directly with the workers Tuesday. He promised to offer two options for the workers, under which they can either claim social insurance payment after leaving their jobs or claim payment after reaching retirement age. His promise won resounding applause from the workers, who agreed to return to work. The newly revised law is expected to go into effect Jan. 1. 2016. The Vietnamese authorities, in view of the scale of the Pou Yuen Vietnam facility, arranged for officials to go there to give a four-day presentation to explain the new policy March 24. Pou Yuen is controlled by shoemaker Yue Yuen Industrial Holdings Ltd, (????), a subsidiary of Taiwan-listed Pou Chen Corp.(??). On the second day of the presentation, however, the workers' anger over the policy led to suspension of the presentation and prompted some workers to start a go-slow March 26. To avoid the high-running feelings of some of the workers affecting safety and production, the management took the initiative to give them two days off on March 27 and 28. The factory was scheduled to resume normal work Monday, but some workers disrupted the factory operations and even walked out in protest over the new policy, at one point blocking traffic outside the factory. Last year, Taiwanese businesses in Vietnam suffered severe damage by rioters protesting over Chinese oil exploration in a disputed area of the South China Sea, forcing the Vietnamese government to make heavy compensation payments. (By Fang Pei-chin and Lilian Wu)


Updated : 2021-09-17 19:04 GMT+08:00