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Premier dismisses talk of pay hikes for government employees

Premier dismisses talk of pay hikes for government employees

Taipei, March 10 (CNA) Premier Mao Chi-kuo (???) said Tuesday that the government should consider raising the salaries of government employees only if widespread pay raises are seen in the private sector. "If private companies widely raise the pay of their employees, then we can think about increasing the pay of government employees," Mao said at a legislative hearing on the issue.
Kuomintang (KMT, ???) legislators have proposed amending four laws and raising the pay of civil servants, teachers, and military personnel, arguing that the raises could carry over to the private sector and ignite growth in Taiwan's stagnant wage level. Asked about the theory by Democratic Progressive Party (???) lawmaker Kao Jyh-peng (???), Mao said he had never advanced that argument and felt that the private sector would have to make the first move. Labor Minister Chen Hsiung-wen said the Executive Yuan would weigh the country's overall economic situation before deciding whether to raise pay for government employees. "There is no set timetable for the issue," he said.
Opposition lawmakers and economists have criticized the proposal by KMT lawmakers as detrimental to the government's finances and motivated more by politics than economic benefit, according to a report in the Liberty Times on Monday.
Chiou Jiunn-rong (???), an economics professor at National Central University (????), was cited as saying that the salaries offered by private companies to their employees should be compared with those of other enterprises rather than pay levels seen in the public sector.
Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU, ??????) lawmaker Lai Chen-chan (???) contended that if the government decided to raise the pay of public servants, it would only further worsen the government's finances and add to the financial burden of the country's taxpayers, according to the Liberty Times report. The paper speculated that KMT lawmakers submitted the proposal to give themselves a better chance of winning seats in the country's legislative elections in early 2016. The KMT took a beating in last November's local elections, and ruling party lawmakers may be worried about their prospects for re-election and holding on to their majority in the Legislative Yuan.
(By T.Y. Tseng and Flor Wang)


Updated : 2021-09-20 10:34 GMT+08:00