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Noted Taiwanese sculptors hold joint exhibition at Juming Museum

Noted Taiwanese sculptors hold joint exhibition at Juming Museum

Taipei, Feb. 19 (CNA) A pioneering Taiwanese sculpture group has organized an exhibition at Juming Museum (?????) in New Taipei, nearly three decades after its last public show in 1986. The "Groundbreaking and Breaking Ground" (???) exhibition by Zodiac Sculpture Group (????) displays works from nine prestigious sculptors in Taiwan, including the late Yuyu Yang (???), Ju Ming (??) and Lee Tsai-chien (???). Other sculptors at the exhibition, which opened Dec. 13, 2014 and will run through Nov. 29 this year, are Wu Chao-hsien (???), Wu-Li Yu-ge (????), Chiu Huan-tang (???), Chen Ting-shih (???), Dawn Chen-ping (???) and Shiau Jon-jen (???). The exhibits use different media, ranging from wood, bronze, ceramics, steel and other metal to mixed media, and are all representative creations of the artists, including a wooden sculpture created by Ju in 1981 titled "Living World Series -- Human Cube." Each Zodiac member is or was a pioneer in Taiwan's burgeoning sculpture art, who helped shape streamline styles for the development of the county's modern sculpting and related art. The veteran sculptors have all played influential roles in Taiwanese artistic circles. "What makes us proud is that even though we each fought alone, working hard in our own separate fields, we managed to bear fruit. And even though each of us has our own unique style, we don't occupy any territories. "However, we are proud of our roles as standard-bearers, promoters and practitioners in the boom of Taiwan's sculpture art," said Lee Tsai-chien in a statement for the opening of the 2015 Zodiac show. Lee, born in 1928, sparked conflict between art and politics in 1983 when his hefty sculpture of an angular red-enameled stainless steel gigantic work titled "Finite and Infinite," raised disputes due to its shape and color, both of which make the work look like a red star, a symbol of communist China. The Zodiac Sculpture Group was born during chats among emerging local sculptors headed by Yuyu Yang at Caf?Astoria close to Taipei Railway Station in April 1973. Yang named the assembly "Wu Xing (??)," or Zodiac in English, after the five elements of metal, wood, water, fire and earth in Chinese philosophy. The five elements, which represent basic substances in the universe, are the most common materials used by sculptors for their creations. The group organized its debut show in 1975, followed by one in 1983 and another in 1986. "Back then, those (joining the 1975 exhibition) were all experts and people with a higher social status because they were from some area of academia, expect for me, an apprentice. If it had not been for my teacher's (Yang's) recommendation, I would never have been able to take part in the show," Ju Ming recalled. Born in 1938, Ju was trained as a woodcarver, apprenticed to temple sculpture and painting master Lee Chin-chuan (???) as a teenager. At the age of 30, he sought Yang's teaching, beginning to develop his skill and apply it to a range of media, including bronze, styrofoam, ceramics and stainless steel. Ju's Taichi-themed series of sculptures in the 1970s won him international fame and a solid status in the art field. He was awarded the 18th Fukuoka Asian Culture Prize in 2007. Zodiac members' longterm devotion to "the development of modern sculpture," "the outbreak and achievments of Taiwan sculpture," and "helping and guiding the younger generations" are their greatest contributions and influences, said Lin Chen-ching (???), head of the research department of Juming Museum and curator of Zodiac's 2015 exhibition. "The Zodiac Sculpture Group is the pioneer of Taiwan's modern sculpture," Lin concluded. (By Elizabeth Hsu)


Updated : 2021-09-23 08:51 GMT+08:00