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Republicans in bind over push to boost defense spending

Effort to boost military spending puts Republicans in a bind on the budget

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2015 file photo, Sen. Jeff Session, R-Ala. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pressing Pentagon demands in a time of terror...
FILE - In this Jan. 7, 2015 file photo. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla. listens on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pressing Pentagon demands in a time of terror th...
FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2015 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., joined by Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas, speaks during a ...

Budget Defense

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2015 file photo, Sen. Jeff Session, R-Ala. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pressing Pentagon demands in a time of terror...

Budget Defense

FILE - In this Jan. 7, 2015 file photo. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla. listens on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pressing Pentagon demands in a time of terror th...

Budget Defense

FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2015 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., joined by Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas, speaks during a ...

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Newly empowered congressional Republicans are in a bind over efforts to boost military spending in a time of terror threats and Islamic State militants.

Defense hawks want to restore previous spending cuts to steer more money to the military, but Republicans are divided over how to do it without piling billions onto the deficit.

Many deficit hawks insist that any increases for the military should be financed by offsetting cuts to domestic programs even as Republican pragmatists warn that could cause a budget logjam that would drag on for months.

The problem stems from the hard-fought budget and debt bill of August 2011 that imposed automatic spending cuts on the operating budgets of virtually every federal agency after the negotiators on the so-called supercommittee failed to reach a broader deal.


Updated : 2021-09-21 22:52 GMT+08:00