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Former deputy MAC chief thanks prosecutors for righting his wrong

Former deputy MAC chief thanks prosecutors for righting his wrong

Taipei, Feb. 10 (CNA) The former China affairs deputy chief who was removed from his post on allegations he spied for China thanked prosecutors Tuesday for vindicating him after they threw out the case against him earlier in the day. Chang Hsien-yao (???), the former second-in-command at both the Cabinet's Mainland Affairs Council and the semi-official Straits Exchange Foundation, said in a press release that prosecutors had conducted a just investigation and quoted Proverbs 14:34 from the Bible: "By righteousness a nation is lifted up." Citing flimsy evidence after months of investigation, prosecutors said Tuesday they would not indict Chang. The former deputy, who held several press events after stepping down in August to proclaim his innocence, said that over his two decades of public service, he has made "working for the maximum interests of Taiwan and upholding cross-strait peace and stability the ultimate goal." He called his forced resignation last August heart-wrenching, noting it came right before his mother passed away at the end of September. The "humiliation," he said, "made me unfilial (to my mother's memory) more than anything else could have" and hampered cross-strait relations, Chang said. When the 51-year-old left his post as deputy minister of the Mainland Affairs Council in August, the council's official explanation was "family reasons." But Chang immediately issued a statement claiming he had "been quit" from the position, causing the council to disclose that he was forced to resign for allegedly leaking information on Taiwan's China policies. With the help of aide Chen Hung-yi (???) and secretary Chang Su-ling (???, no relation), he was alleged to have used phone calls, text messages, and e-mails from June 2012 to February 2014 to inform Beijing of secret information. The Taipei Prosecutors Office ultimately dropped the case because there was nothing suspicious about his communications. Prosecutors said the information provided was only standard documents and visitors' itineraries, and not the substantive content of negotiations he had been accused of leaking. They also said that former National Security Bureau chief Tsai De-sheng (???) testified that during his more than five years in office, he closely followed exchanges that Chang Hsien-yao and others had with China and would have reported any suspicions of spying if he had them. Tsai was in office from May 2009 to May 2014.
Other witnesses noted that Taiwan had sent Chang Hsien-yao to China between August 2013 and January 2014 to discuss Taiwan's bid to join international organizations. The government fully trusted him to execute those missions, during which there was no evidence of abnormal behavior, witnesses said. His boss, Mainland Affairs Council Minister Wang Yu-chi (???), had testified that he was told by Taiwanese businessmen in China that "Chang (Hsien-yao) was close to Chinese officials and problems could occur in the future." Prosecutors said they would not make indictments for leaking secrets to China simply on "hearsay". Chang Hsien-yao was the deputy head of mainland affairs from February 2012 until his forced resignation in August 2014. (By Page Tsai, Y. F. Low and Lilian Wu)


Updated : 2021-09-22 17:19 GMT+08:00