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4-time NASCAR champ Jeff Gordon makes 2015 season his last

4-time NASCAR champion Jeff Gordon will retire as full-time driver after 2015 season

4-time NASCAR champ Jeff Gordon makes 2015 season his last

Jeff Gordon, the charismatic four-time NASCAR champion who became the face of the stock car series as it exploded in popularity a generation ago, will retire as a full-time driver after the 2015 season.

Gordon did not officially call his decision a retirement on Thursday because there is "always the possibility I'll compete in selected events, although I currently have no plans to do that." He has spent his entire 23-year career in the No. 24 car with Hendrick Motorsports, and he delivered the news to his team at its shop in Charlotte, North Carolina.

"As a race car driver, much of what I've done throughout my life has been based on following my instincts and trying to make good decisions," Gordon said. "I thought long and hard about my future this past year and during the offseason, and I've decided 2015 will be the last time I compete for a championship."

The 43-year-old Gordon is coming off one of his best seasons in years, one that ended a single point short of another shot at a title. He won four times in 2014.

Gordon suffered serious issues years ago in his back, specifically his lower spine, and needed anti-inflammatory medication and workouts with a trainer to return to full strength. He drove in pain during a winless 2008 season and briefly contemplated retirement. He did not cite health issues in Thursday's announcement.

Gordon's fame reaches far beyond the track and resonates with non-sports fans. He won all the big races, and collected four championships in a seven-year span.

He was a new breed of driver when he broke into NASCAR's top series, arriving with a sprint car pedigree and talent that made him an immediate contender. Gordon was a clean-cut kid who raised NASCAR's corporate image beyond its moonshine roots, making it a legitimate power on Madison Avenue as tens of thousands of new fans flocked to automobile racing in the late 1990s and 2000s.

Gordon became such a household name that he even hosted "Saturday Night Live" and was name-dropped in a Nelly song. He did it all while dominating as the "Rainbow Warrior."

Gordon debuted in the final race of the 1992 season at Atlanta, and heads into this season with 92 career wins and championships in 1995, 1997, 1998 and 2001. Gordon is third in career victories, trailing only Hall of Fame drivers Richard Petty (200) and David Pearson (105). He has three Daytona 500 victories and a record five Brickyard 400 wins, including last year's race.

Gordon has won at every track on the circuit except Kentucky Speedway. His four championships trail Petty and Dale Earnhardt, who won seven each, and Jimmie Johnson, with six.


Updated : 2021-09-18 20:03 GMT+08:00