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Microsoft says it plans to give Vista data to McAfee, Symantec

Microsoft says it plans to give Vista data to McAfee, Symantec

Microsoft Corp. said it would give U.S. security vendors Symantec Corp. and McAfee Inc. on Monday some of the information they want to make their products work with Microsoft's new operating system Vista.
Microsoft spokesman Tom Brookes said the software interfaces for the security dashboard Windows Security Center would shortly be uploaded to a Web site for software developers.
Both security companies complained loudly last month that Microsoft was withholding key information they needed to develop software compatible with Vista before it is handed over to computer manufacturers next month. The software hits shops in January.
Symantec said it was looking for code for Windows Security Center and Microsoft's anti-spyware program, Defender, so the system could recognize its software brands.
These should now be available, Microsoft said.
Microsoft also said it planned to talk to both Symantec and McAfee to discuss the changes they want made to Microsoft's anti-hacking tool Patchguard. Symantec wanted its software to be excluded from Patchguard's scope so it would not be wrongly identified as a threat to the system.
On Friday, the software giant said it had made changes to Vista in several key sectors to soothe European antitrust worries and the operating system would be distributed worldwide on schedule.
The company's General Counsel Brad Smith said Microsoft made changes to Vista's search service and security system on the advise of European antitrust officials and had an international standards organization look at its new PDF-type file format.
Microsoft was hoping to have solved trade worries in South Korea as well, he said.
The EU antitrust office refused to back Microsoft's optimism that European concerns had been met. "The jury is out," said EU spokesman Jonathan Todd on Friday. "It is up to Microsoft to shoulder its own responsibility to ensure full compliance with competition rules."
He said the Commission would "closely monitor the effects on the market and in particular examine any complaints."
The EU and the global software giant have fought for years and the 25-nation bloc already levied a record euro497 million (US$613 million) fine on Microsoft in 2004 and ordered it to hand over communications code to rivals, saying it had deliberately tried to cripple them as it won control of the market.


Updated : 2021-10-18 19:45 GMT+08:00