Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Household dining-out costs up NT$2,610 in 2014

Household dining-out costs up NT$2,610 in 2014

Taipei, Jan. 10 (CNA) Households in Taiwan paid additional NT$2,610 (US$81.56) in dining-out costs in 2014, making many people here feel the pinch of higher consumer prices at a time when local wages continue to stagnate, according to government statistics released Saturday. The Directorate General of Budget, Accounting and Statistics (DGBAS) said that dining-out costs in Taiwan rose 3.61 percent year-on-year in 2014 largely due to rising food prices, which grew 3.74 percent from the previous year. Higher food and dining-out costs made the relatively lower consumer price index (CPI) growth seem insignificant to some. In 2014, the local CPI rose by just 1.2 percent, the sixth consecutive year it has risen by less than 2 percent, while fuel costs and prices of non-food items, such as communications services and lower 3C devices went down. The DGBAS said that for a household with a monthly spending of NT$60,000, it had to spend NT$2,610 more in dining-out in 2014 than 2013. Among the popular restaurants in Taiwan, Formosa Chang, a traditional Taiwanese cuisine chain, raised the price of its braised pork rice to NT$35 from NT$33 in July. It was the third price hike for Formosa Chang in 2014. Many other braised pork rice suppliers also raised their products to NT$30-NT$45 from NT$25. A man surnamed Chen, 30, who moved from Kaohsiung to Taipei five years ago to work, said that he started to feel life has become more difficult in the wake of rising dining-out costs as he earns only about NT$30,000 a month. According to a recent media report, about 85 percent of the people in Taiwan aged 20-65 dined out at least once a day. The DGBAS said that based on the rigid pricing characteristics of restaurants and eateries, once dining-out costs go up, it is unlikely for consumers to see the prices come down, even when commodity prices fall. Due to the higher food prices in 2014, the DGBAS said that a household which spends NT$60,000 a month on eating out spent an additional NT$7,058 in foods last year. But due to a steep decline in international crude oil prices, household fuel spending fell NT$856 last year, the government agency said. The price of a basket of 17 household necessities -- including rice, pork, bread, eggs, sugar, cooking oil, shampoo and toilet paper -- monitored by the Cabinet rose 5.35 percent in 2014, the highest rise since 2008, when the price of the items rose 13.65 percent. (By Chen Cheng-wei and Frances Huang)


Updated : 2021-09-27 22:15 GMT+08:00