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Taiwan News Morning Briefing – October 8

Extolling Taiwan's long-term diplomatic relations with Honduras, President Ma Ying-jeou said to a visiting official from the Latin American ally Tuesd...
The prices of Japanese products on the local market have remained unchanged despite a depreciating yen, leading Premier Jiang Yi-huah Tuesday to call ...

Extolling Taiwan's long-term diplomatic relations with Honduras, President Ma Ying-jeou said to a visiting official from the Latin American ally Tuesd...

The prices of Japanese products on the local market have remained unchanged despite a depreciating yen, leading Premier Jiang Yi-huah Tuesday to call ...

Market & Commodity ■ Taiwan stock market (TWSE) opened 50.82 points, or 0.56%, lower to 8989.99 on Wednesday, with turnover reaching NT$1.39 billion. (Taiwan News) ■ U.S. stock market slumped Tuesday as investors worried about the outlook for global economic growth. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 272.52 points, or 1.6 percent, to 16,719.39. The Standard & Poor's 500 index dropped 29.72 points, or 1.5 percent, to 1,935.10. The Nasdaq composite fell 69.60 points, or 1.6 percent, to 4,385.20. (AP) World News ■ Crowds of protesters who filled Hong Kong's streets with demands for a greater say in choosing the territory's leader thin dramatically after student leaders and the government agree to hold talks in the increasingly frustrated city. Just a couple days after tens of thousands of demonstrators thronged the city's streets, only a few hundred protesters were scattered across the city's three main protest areas. (AP) ■ Warships from the rival Koreas exchange warning shots after a North Korean ship briefly violated the disputed western sea boundary, a South Korean defense official says. The shots were fired into the sea and there were no reports of injuries and damage to the ships of either side. (AP) ■ Indian and Pakistani troops fire bullets and mortar shells across the border between Kashmir and Pakistan for a second day, with both accusing the other of provoking the violence. Police in both countries said troops exchanged fire for hours overnight, killing a Pakistani man and injuring at least 22 others. Earlier violence on Monday killed nine civilians. (AP) ■ Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano of Japan and U.S. scientist Shuji Nakamura win the Nobel Prize in physics for the invention of blue light-emitting diodes, a breakthrough that spurred the development of LED technology used to light up computer screens and modern smartphones. (AP) ■ The dengue virus has killed six people and infected more than 23,000 in southern China's worst outbreak of the mosquito-transmitted disease in about two decades, officials say. (AP) ■ The Myanmar government pardons 3,073 prisoners as part of an amnesty, a month before a summit of regional leaders convenes in the country. (AP) ■ In a preview to earnings due out this month, the world’s biggest smartphone maker Samsung Electronics Co. says its quarterly profit is estimated to have fallen to its lowest level in more than three years, dragged down by weak sales of its new Galaxy model. (AP) Local News ■ Premier Jiang Yi-huah rebuffed rumors about an impending Cabinet shuffle Monday and said a replacement for Minister of Health and Welfare Chiu Wen-ta would be named within a month. The media have been buzzing with reports that the Cabinet could undergo an overhaul after the 9-in-1 elections in late November, but Jiang denied that any such plans exist, saying the make-up of the Cabinet had nothing to do with elections. (Taiwan News) ■ Premier Jiang Yi-huah on Tuesday warned against cyberattacks from China designed to steal secrets. Cyberwarfare has become a larger priority for the Taiwanese military and security establishment as online attacks and hacking launched from China has become an international concern. (Taiwan News) ■ Taipei City independent mayoral candidate Ko Wen-je on Tuesday condemned the ruling Kuomintang for mobilizing the full force of the state, including the tax office, against one man over his hospital account. (Taiwan News) ■ Taiwanese fabless design house MediaTek posted revenue of NT$18.54 billion for September on Tuesday, representing a slight drop of 5.65% from August but a robust growth of 42.2% from last year. The company’s Q3 consolidated revenue was NT$57.47 billion in line with its previous estimate of between NT$56.8 billion and 61.2 billion, increasing 6.16% on quarter and setting another record high in quarter. (Taiwan News) ■ Highwealth Construction Corp. has announced a plan to build a housing complex for retirees in northern Taiwan. Construction on the new retirement village will be launched in early 2015. Also, Liao Chao-hsiung, the company’s vice president, states that it will expand its business with the aim of becoming one of the top ten real estate developers in Asia. (CNA) ■ The government touted its record of convictions of corrupt public servants Tuesday, arguing that the success in bringing them to justice proves that President Ma Ying-jeou's government is tougher on corruption than his DPP predecessor. Since Ma took the presidency back for the Kuomintang in 2008, there have been a total of 2,823 indictments of 8,898 people, with a higher conviction rate of 67.3 percent, higher than 62.1 percent in Chen’s era. (CNA) ■ Good news for expectant mothers: they can look forward to as much as full pay during maternity leave following a new measure announced Tuesday by the Ministry of Labor, effective immediately. Under the new measure, women who take the up-to-56-day maternity leave allowed under the Labor Standards Act are now entitled to full pay during the time off as long as they have been at their jobs for more than six months. Otherwise, they receive half pay. (CNA)


Updated : 2021-04-17 17:08 GMT+08:00