Alexa

Venezuelan foreign minister calls Bush 'monster'

Venezuelan foreign minister calls Bush 'monster'

Venezuela's foreign minister called U.S. President George W. Bush a "monster" on Friday, adding to a list of insults recently used by President Hugo Chavez for his nemesis _ from devil to donkey.
Foreign Minister Nicolas Maduro called for Bush's removal from the White House and denounced what he called a worldwide campaign by Washington to block Venezuela's bid for a seat on the U.N. Security Council.
"That monster who is in the White House must be removed because we, the peoples (of the world), want peace and justice," Maduro said at a news conference in Caracas.
Chavez, who has repeatedly accused Washington of trying to oust him, called Bush the devil last month in a speech to the United Nations. He also has labeled Bush an alcoholic, a donkey and "Mr. Danger."
The Bush administration has accused the leftist Chavez of endangering Venezuelan democracy and being a destabilizing influence in Latin America.
Tensions between the two countries were raised further last month when Maduro was detained for 90 minutes at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport.
The foreign minister complained that authorities tried to frisk him and threatened to handcuff him. U.S. officials have apologized.
Venezuela is seeking a rotating seat on the U.N. Security Council in a secret-ballot vote scheduled for Oct. 16, but the U.S. has been opposing Venezuela's bid while backing Guatemala instead.
On Friday, Maduro also reiterated Venezuela's demands for the U.S. to extradite Cuban-born militant Luis Posada Carriles, who is wanted on charges of masterminding the 1976 bombing of a Cuban airliner that killed all 73 people on board.
Posada is held in the United States on unrelated immigration charges. Maduro said the U.S. is being hypocritical by waging its so-called war against terrorism while "protecting" an accused terrorist like Posada.
Maduro criticized Washington for not turning over two former Venezuelan military officers in the U.S. who are charged with carrying out bomb attacks in 2003 against the Colombian consulate and Spanish embassy in Caracas, which injured four people.
The foreign minister also called a planned barrier along the U.S.-Mexico border "a wall of contempt."
The foreign minister didn't limit his criticisms to Washington, saying that former Spanish Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar is of today's "puppy dogs" of the U.S., and accusing him of leading a campaign to try to harm relations between Venezuela and Spain.


Updated : 2021-03-08 18:35 GMT+08:00