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In Brief

In Brief

Morales, Saddam on U.S. no-fly list
NEW YORK, New York
Bolivian President Evo Morales, Saddam Hussein and 14 of the 19 dead Sept. 11 hijackers are among the names on the U.S. no-fly list designed to stop terrorists boarding planes, 60 Minutes said on Thursday.
The CBS news program said in a statement it had obtained a March copy of the secret U.S. government list of 44,000 people, used to screen airline passengers for potential terrorists.
Former FBI agent Jack Cloonan told the show, to be broadcast tomorrow, that the list was hastily assembled after the September 11 attacks and was bungled.
"When we heard the name list or no-fly list ... the eyes rolled back in my head, because we knew what was going to happen," he says.
While the list includes such unlikely would-be terrorists as Nabih Berri, Lebanon's parliamentary speaker, many others were not on the list, 60 Minutes reports. It noted the 11 British suspects recently charged with plotting to blow up airliners with liquid explosives were not on it, despite being under surveillance for more than a year.
80-year-old dealer
PITTSBURGH, Pennsylvania
An 80-year-old man convicted of dealing crack cocaine was paroled after spending three nights in jail.
Felix Cocco, a World War II veteran from Pittsburgh, sold crack cocaine from his house and gave some of the drugs to prostitutes in exchange for sex, his lawyer said Thursday. Cocco pleaded guilty in July to possessing cocaine with intent to deliver.
A judge sentenced him Monday to six to 18 months in jail but indicated he was willing to consider a parole petition from the defense.
Defense attorney Martha Bailor argued that her client should be spared jail because he suffers from an aortic aneurysm. Cocco is scheduled to have vascular surgery in January, she said.
Cocco will wear an ankle bracelet so authorities can monitor his activities, police said.
Police said Cocco had been dealing drugs for nearly a year when he was arrested in November, and was caught dealing again in February. Officers said they seized crack cocaine, a digital scale and packaging materials. Bailor told the court her client wanted to remain sexually active after his wife died three years ago and he turned to prostitutes.
Meltdown victims
LOS ANGELES, California
A 1959 nuclear reactor meltdown at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory may have caused hundreds of cases of cancer in the community, and chemicals threaten to contaminate ground and water, according to a report.
The report released Thursday by an independent advisory panel estimated it was likely that radiation released during the meltdown caused about 260 cases of cancer within a 154-square-kilometer area around the reactor.
The lab's former owner, Rocketdyne, has said for years that no significant radiation was released. But the independent advisory panel said the incident released nearly 459 times more radiation than a similar one at Pennsylvania's Three Mile Island in 1979.
"People have been asking for 20 years what was the impact of the meltdown, and now they will at least have an approximation of how many people may have been hurt," said Dan Hirsch, co-chairman of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory Advisory Panel.


Updated : 2021-07-31 19:44 GMT+08:00