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Su Tseng-chang chairs final CSC meet

DPP members to elect new chair May 25

Su Tseng-chang chairs final CSC meet

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – Democratic Progressive Party Chairman Su Tseng-chang presided over his final Central Standing Committee meeting Wednesday before handing over power to his successor next week.
On Sunday, more than 143,000 DPP members can choose between former Chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen and former Kaohsiung County Vice Magistrate Kuo Tai-lin to decide who will run the main opposition party for the next two years, a term which will include the November 29 regional and local elections as well as presidential and legislative elections in early 2016.
Tsai is not only virtually certain of winning the chairmanship race, but is also considered a frontrunner for the next presidential election.
A meeting of the party’s Central Executive Committee next Wednesday has to ratify the May 25 election result before immediately swearing in the new opposition leader.
Party members will also choose local division directors and congress delegates at a total of 126 polling stations, reports said.
On Wednesday afternoon, the CSC discussed the issue of constitutional reform, which has been managed by a special taskforce during the last two months. The new party leader would take over the presiding role over the committee next week as well, reports said.
Su already presented his key ideas for constitutional reform last week. They included a clearer definition of the roles of president and Cabinet, lower thresholds for referendums and recalls, changes to the election system and a controversial suggestion that the size of the Legislative Yuan could be expanded from its present 113 seats to between 200 and 300.
The last proposal provoked criticism because the DPP was instrumental in cutting the Legislature’s size by half in 2004, at the suggestion of ex-Chairman Lin Yi-hsiung and with the approval of then-President Chen Shui-bian.
Critics of the smaller-sized Legislature said that in combination with the single-seat constituency system, it had polarized opinions in the country, helping political parties to hold on to their strongholds and preventing a younger generation from moving into more visible positions of power.
A discussion has also started on whether Taiwan should have a presidential or a Cabinet system instead of the existing unclear mixture, and about whether or not the number of at-large lawmakers elected on a party list according to proportional representation should be expanded.


Updated : 2021-06-21 16:17 GMT+08:00