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Kramnik and Tompalov draw game 7 at world chess tournament in Russia

Kramnik and Tompalov draw game 7 at world chess tournament in Russia

Vladimir Kramnik of Russia and Veselin Topalov of Bulgaria drew Game 7 Wednesday, leaving Kramnik with a 4-3 lead in the 12-game world chess tournament which has been marred by allegations of cheating and now the threat of a lawsuit.
Kramnik, the Classical World Champion, and Topalov, the World Chess Champion, are playing the tournament in the sixth attempt to reunify the chess world since 1993, when then-world champion Garry Kasparov broke away from the World Chess Federation, known by its French acronym, FIDE.
Turmoil at the tournament _ being held in the poor southern Russian city of Elitsa _ erupted last week after Topalov's manager alleged that Kramnik may have been using a private bathroom to cheat. Organizers ordered the players' private bathrooms closed and insisted that each use a common bathroom, prompting Kramnik to boycott Game 5 last Friday and appeal to have the game replayed.
Two days of intensive talks, however, resulted in the appeals committee resigning and Kramnik resuming playing but he filed a second appeal to a new committee to replay Game 5 _ an appeal that was also rejected. Prior to the boycott, Kramnik won two games.
"We should like to point out that the appointment of the new appeals committee does not mean that the new one appointed has the power of overruling any decisions taken by the former appeals committee, which are absolutely final," the new committee said in a statement Wednesday.
Kramnik's manager, Carsten Hensel, meanwhile, said Kramnik would sue FIDE after the tournament concluded.
Adding to the drama Wednesday, Topalov insisted on holding a separate post-match news conference from Kramnik, which is a violation of the tournament's contract.
"I do not think we should pretend we are friends," Topalov said later. "This rule (of joint press conferences after the game) surprised me even when I saw it in the contract... Kramnik is my opponent.
Kramnik wasn't disappointed: "It is a violation of contract, but OK, I agree to it."
Topalov's manager Silvio Danailov issued an open letter in which he claimed to back up his allegations that Kramnik was secretly using an electronic device to cheat during frequent trips to his bathroom.
Danailov said the percentages of moves made by Kramnik coincided with the best moves suggested by a popular computer chess program _ Fritz9.
"Out of 5 games, 78 percent of Mr. Kramnik's moves match with the first line of Fritz9," the letter said.
Kramnik called for Danailov to be investigated by the FIDE ethics committee: "I am prepared for more dirty tricks from the opposing team."
On the chessboard, meanwhile, Topalov deviated from openings that have previously occurred in the series, but maintained no advantage. The subsequent superficial and fast-paced play of the Bulgarian resulted in Kramnik winning a pawn after 4 hours of play. However, Topalov managed to hold the balance in an endgame.
Kramnik will be playing with White pieces in Game 8, which is scheduled for Thursday.
The tournament is scheduled to conclude Oct. 13, with the two 31-year-old players slated to equally divide the tax-free US$1 million (euro790,000) prize no matter who wins.


Updated : 2021-02-28 21:06 GMT+08:00