Lin indicted for hitting commentator

Accused says he will not apologize until Chin apologizes for interruptions on talk show

Lin Cheng-chieh, right, a former Democratic Progressive Party legislator and now the head of a unification party was indicted yesterday for attacking

Lin Cheng-chieh, right, a former Democratic Progressive Party legislator and now the head of a unification party was indicted yesterday for attacking

Lin Cheng-chieh, right, a former Democratic Progressive Party legislator and now the head of a unification party was indicted yesterday for attacking

Lin Cheng-chieh, right, a former Democratic Progressive Party legislator and now the head of a unification party was indicted yesterday for attacking

Prosecutors in Taipei indicted former Democratic Progressive Party Legislator Lin Cheng-chieh yesterday for assaulting and threatening political commentator Chin Heng-wei (金恒煒) on a live TV talk show in August.
"The prosecution brought an indictment against Lin because of clear evidence that indicated his alleged offense," said Lin Chin-tsun, spokesperson of the Taipei District Prosecutors Office.
Lin, who fell out with the DPP in 1990 and is currently chairman of a pro-unification party, the Party for Promoting Chinese Unification, slapped Chin suddenly after they had an argument on a Formosa TV talk show. Lin then cuffed Chin and kicked him several times until other guests stepped in to prevent further violence.
Lin later said that he was at the end of his tether, due to Chin's incessant interruptions while he was voicing his opinion on whether it was possible that ex-DPP Chairman Shih Ming-teh (施明德) wrote several letters to Chiang Kai-shek (蔣介石) begging to be pardoned after being put behind bars by the oppressive Kuomintang in the 1970s for advocating Taiwan's democratization.
Following the assault, Lin issued a public statement, saying "I will beat him (Chin) every time I see him."
Lin explained that he was prepared to follow through on his promise because he could not put up with Chin's criticism of Shih, who he considered a hero for heading the current anti-corruption campaign aimed at calling for the president to step down.
The prosecution began investigation of the attack after Chin filed a lawsuit against Lin at the end of August. Prosecutors subpoenaed Lin and Chin for questioning last Friday, but decided not to have them arrive at the same time due to Lin's threat of further confrontations.
Commenting on the indictment, Lin said yesterday that he accepted the proceedings since he felt obligated to take full legal responsibility for his unruly behavior, but he declared that he would not offer an apology to Chin, unless "Chin first apologizes for constantly interrupting my remarks" on the talk show in the first place.
In his turn, on Friday Lin filed a lawsuit against Chin over the fracas in August, claiming that he suffered injuries due to beating Chin.