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Taiwan plans to complete GMP oil checks in one week: official

Taiwan plans to complete GMP oil checks in one week: official

Taipei, Oct. 23 (CNA) Tests on all edible oils that have good manufacturing practice (GMP) certification or are labeled as 100 percent pure will be completed in one week, Vice Economics Minister Duh Tyzz-jiun said Wednesday amid an edible oil scandal in Taiwan. Tests on oils advertised as 100 percent pure should be done in two days, Duh said. But the process for GMP-certified blended oils will take longer because the Ministry of Economic Affairs needs to gather import declarations and invoices for imported materials to check against companies' production records, Duh said.
Shen Jung-chin, the director-general of the ministry's Industrial Development Bureau (IDB), added that manufacturers needed to send their GMP-certified blended oils to the Food Industry Research and Development Institute (FIRDI) quickly for testing. The ministry announced the checks after a meeting attended by the IDB, the FIRDI and the Taiwan Food Good Manufacturing Practice Development Association to review the GMP system at the request of Premier Jiang Yi-huah. The system has been called into question after GMP-certified oils produced by Chang Chi Foodstuff Factory Co. were found to have been adulterated by the company, which replaced more expensive oils with cheaper oils and used a banned additive in a product sold as olive oil. Shen said there are currently 16 edible oil manufacturers and 129 oil products that have obtained GMP certification, including more than 20 products from seven companies labeled as 100 percent pure. To more effectively control the quality of oils sold to consumers in the shorter term, Shen said his agency would soon launch random checks of oil products and set up a hotline ((02) 2325-0955) to encourage the public to provide tips on substandard products. He will also convene a meeting with edible oil suppliers to discuss ways to help them weed out poor quality products during the production process. Over the longer term, the bureau will set up a special task force to gather information on food certification management systems and practices in other countries, and invite producers and experts to develop a food certification system that can meet public expectations, Shen said. At the same time, Kuomintang lawmaker Wu Yu-ren urged the government to protect the identities of Chang Chi employees who tipped off authorities to the company's illegal practices. He also suggested that 3-5 percent of the fines the company pays be earmarked as reward money for the whistle blowers. The Kaohsiung-based Consumer Protection Association of Taiwan, meanwhile, said it will help consumers seek refunds from Chiang Chi and file a class action lawsuit on behalf of affected consumers against the company. Opposition legislators were trying to broaden the system of food checks on Wednesday, demanding that the Council of Agriculture complete a check of 6,550 products with the COA's CAS (certified agricultural standards) label in one month. (By Angela Tsai, Huang Chiao-wen, Yang Su-min, Chang Che-fon and Y.L. Kao)


Updated : 2021-07-29 01:28 GMT+08:00