Alexa

Fed stands by stimulus, sees stronger US economy

 Specialists Christopher Gildea, left, and Joseph Dreyer confer on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Wednesday, March 20, 2013. In a statement ...
 Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke speaks during a news conference in Washington, Wednesday, March 20, 2013, following the Federal Open Market Com...
 Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke leaves following a news conference in Washington, Wednesday, March 20, 2013, following the Federal Open Market ...
 A television screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange shows the decision of the Federal Reserve, Wednesday, March 20, 2013. In a statement ...

Wall Street Federal Reserve

Specialists Christopher Gildea, left, and Joseph Dreyer confer on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Wednesday, March 20, 2013. In a statement ...

Bernanke

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke speaks during a news conference in Washington, Wednesday, March 20, 2013, following the Federal Open Market Com...

Bernanke

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke leaves following a news conference in Washington, Wednesday, March 20, 2013, following the Federal Open Market ...

Wall Street Federal Reserve

A television screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange shows the decision of the Federal Reserve, Wednesday, March 20, 2013. In a statement ...

The Federal Reserve says the U.S. economy has strengthened after pausing late last year but still needs the Fed's extraordinary support to help lower high unemployment.
In a statement after a two-day meeting, the Fed says it's standing by its plan to keep short-term rates at record lows at least until unemployment falls to 6.5 percent, as long as the inflation outlook remains mild. And it says it will continue buying $85 billion a month in bonds indefinitely to keep long-term borrowing costs down.
The unemployment rate fell to a four-year low of 7.7 percent in February, among many signs of a healthier economy. The Fed notes in its statement that the job market has improved. But its latest economic forecast maintains that unemployment won't reach 6.5 percent until 2015.