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Protesters demand appointment of new directors for public TV service

Protesters demand appointment of new directors for public TV service

Taipei, Jan. 21 (CNA) A group of protesters urged Taiwan's Cabinet, the Executive Yuan, on Monday to complete the approval of nominees to the board of directors for the island's Public Television Service within two months. The protesters, mobilized by groups including the Campaign for Media Reform and the Association of Taiwan Journalists, also urged the Executive Yuan to work together with the Legislative Yuan to revise the director-selection precess for the TV station in the next legislative session, and apologize to the people for failing to bring forth enough directors for the board to function thus far. The protesters walked nearly four hours to the Executive Yuan to air their demands after staging a brief sit-in in front of the Public Television Service station in Neihu District, Taipei City to show their disapproval of the absence of a working board of directors for the service. In a response to the protesters, Cheng Li-wun, the spokeswoman for the Executive Yuan, said the Executive Yuan and the Ministry of Culture will continue their efforts to revise the Public Television Act in hopes of streamlining the process of appointing directors for the Public Television Service. Cheng said the Executive Yuan will support to the hilt Minister of Culture Lung Yin-tai to revise the act in the next legislative session to facilitate the appointments of new directors. According to the act, the Public Television Service's directors should be nominated by the Executive Yuan and approved by three fourths of the members of a 15-person commission formed exclusively for this purpose. The commission's members are selected by the various political parties in the legislature, in proportion to the number of legislative seats each party holds. As a result, they often disagree with each other on the candidates, and it takes only three nays to nix a candidate nominated. The latest directors of the service should have been sworn in in 2010, but because of the bipartisan bickering among members of the commission, so far only 13 members have been approved-- four shy of the 17 needed to form a valid board -- despite three batches of nominees having been presented by the Executive Yuan so far. Minister of Culture Lung Ying-tai, who vowed to revise the act, after the commission gave the green light only to five out of 15 candidates named by her on Jan. 18, proposed on Monday to have the directors approved by the Executive Yuan, as the directors of the National Culture and Arts Foundation do, rather than by the ad hoc commission. "Under the ridiculous current process, even the president or God would fail to get approval," said Lung. (By Hsu Hui, Angela Tsai and Maubo Chang)


Updated : 2021-06-20 23:50 GMT+08:00