Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Bettman says another NHL lockout looms

 Pittsburgh Penguins hockey player  Sidney Crosby speaks to reporters during a news conference in New York, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. With a lockout l...
 NHL Players Association executive director Donald Fehr, right, is joined by hockey players as he speaks to reporters during a news conference in New ...
 NHL commissioner Gary Bettman listens as he meets with reporters after a meeting with team owners, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012 in New York.  The current...
 Commissioner Gary Bettman leaves a news conference after meeting with NHL hockey team owners, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, in New York. The current coll...

NHL Labor Hockey

Pittsburgh Penguins hockey player Sidney Crosby speaks to reporters during a news conference in New York, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. With a lockout l...

NHL Labor Hockey

NHL Players Association executive director Donald Fehr, right, is joined by hockey players as he speaks to reporters during a news conference in New ...

NHL Labor Hockey

NHL commissioner Gary Bettman listens as he meets with reporters after a meeting with team owners, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012 in New York. The current...

NHL Labor Hockey

Commissioner Gary Bettman leaves a news conference after meeting with NHL hockey team owners, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, in New York. The current coll...

With a lockout drawing ever closer, the NHL and the players' union are in touch with each other after a day of internal meetings.
But no new negotiating sessions are scheduled for Friday, one day before league commissioner Gary Bettman has said he will lock out the players. This would be the NHL's fourth work stoppage since 1992.
On Thursday, NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly spoke to special counsel Steve Fehr, the brother of union executive director Donald Fehr. They did not, however, discuss a possible return to the bargaining table.
The contract expires at late Saturday. Bettman has said the season won't start without a new deal. Training camps are to open next Friday, and the season is to begin on Oct. 11.
"We have been clear that the collective bargaining agreement, upon its expiration, needs to have a successful agreement for us to move forward," Bettman said on Thursday. "The league is not in a position, not willing to move forward with another season under the status quo."
The players turned out in force just a few blocks away at another midtown Manhattan hotel. Solidarity was evident, but optimism wasn't.
The last labor stoppage caused the cancellation of the entire 2004-05 season, a lockout that ended only when players accepted a salary cap and a 24 percent rollback of salaries.
"Right now it's not looking great," said Pittsburgh Penguins star Sidney Crosby, who was just 17 when the last lockout ended, "but things can change pretty quickly."
Following lockouts last year by NBA and NFL owners, Bettman says NHL management is determined to come away with economic gains.
"Two other leagues _ the NBA and the NFL _ their players have recognized that in these economic times there is a need to retrench," Bettman said after a two-hour owners' meeting.
Damage from a lockout will occur almost immediately, and there is no telling how jilted fans and sponsors will react to another shutdown.
"One of the questions that needs to be asked is, if indeed they lock out, if indeed they do do that, (whether) that is reasonably calculated to make a deal more likely or less likely?" union head Donald Fehr said. "I think you can figure out the answer."
Players currently receive 57 percent of league-related revenue, and the owners want to bring that number down as far as perhaps 47 percent _ which is an increase from their original offer of 43 percent. The union offered a deal based on actual dollars, seeking a guarantee of the $1.8 billion players received last season.
Annual industry revenue has grown from $2.1 billion to $3.3 billion under the expiring deal. Owners asked players to cut their share of league-related revenue during a six-year proposal. Players are concerned management hasn't addressed the league's problems by re-examining the teams' revenue-sharing formula.
Having made several big concessions to make a deal in 2005, the union doesn't think it should have to make more this time after a period of record financial growth. The average player salary also jumped from $1.45 million to $2.55 million over the course of the current agreement.