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IBM encourages positive thinking for innovative talents

IBM encourages positive thinking for innovative talents

Taipei, Aug. 27 (CNA) Taiwanese young workers should act open-mindedly when working on technology innovations as part of efforts to make new breakthrough discoveries, according to an expert at U.S. computer services company IBM Corp. "One thing that I strongly believe in is a positive attitude," said Josephine Cheng, an IBM fellow and chief technology officer for Greater China Group. "Everything always has two sides. If you look at the positive side, then you will move on," she said in an interview recently. The second thing that matters is "dare to make mistakes," Cheng said. Since no one makes mistakes deliberately, people will learn something and become smarter when they make mistakes, she noted. "If you want breakthrough technology, you have to start with mistakes," Cheng added. "You will need to take a risk. And when you take a risk, the chance of making a mistake is high." Moreover, Cheng encouraged Taiwanese companies to create innovations in cooperation with others. For example, IBM has hosted forums and projects every year with its partners in the supply chain to share their experiences and visions. IBM hopes its employees can foster various kinds of possibilities for innovations through these exchange platforms, instead of thinking as individuals, she said. Given Taiwan's leading position in the global semiconductor industry, Taiwanese companies should have enough resources and power to foster new technologies, Cheng said. But the key factor for Taiwanese tech companies, she said, is to hold an open attitude and keep a low profile when collaborating with other companies. Speaking on the future trend of technology innovation, Cheng believes the tech industry will move toward the "cognitive computing" technology, a learning system that can explain evidence and understand messages interactively. Existing cloud computing systems will be integrated into the cognitive computing system, making computers more evolved and able to simulate the complicated responses of human brains, she said. Cheng's remarks came after some analysts called for the creation of innovative talents in Taiwan to halt a slide in its economic growth. On Aug. 17, Taiwan cut its annual gross domestic product (GDP) growth forecast for 2012 to 1.66 percent, down from the previous estimate of 2.08 percent in late July. It marks the eighth consecutive time the projection has been adjusted downward since last August, when the first 2012 GDP growth estimate was made at 4.58 percent. The revision of the GDP forecast could be partially attributed to Taiwan's export orders for July, which fell more than economists had previously estimated. Export orders for July fell by 4.4 percent from a year earlier to US$35.94 billion, the fifth straight monthly decline, on faltering global demand, according to government figures. (By Jeffrey Wu)


Updated : 2021-01-19 20:07 GMT+08:00