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British police demand WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange report to station

 FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2012 file photo, Julian Assange, WikiLeaks founder, arrives at the Supreme Court in London. On Tuesday, June 19, 2012, Ecuador...

Australia Julian Assange Ecuador

FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2012 file photo, Julian Assange, WikiLeaks founder, arrives at the Supreme Court in London. On Tuesday, June 19, 2012, Ecuador...

British police served Julian Assange on Thursday with a demand that he report to a police station as the first step in his extradition to Sweden to face sex crime allegations.

The WikiLeaks founder said he was unlikely to obey the order to show up on Friday.
The letter was delivered to Ecuador's London embassy, where Assange has been holed up for nine days.
The Metropolitan Police said it had "served a surrender notice upon a 40-year-old man that requires him to attend a police station at a date and time of our choosing. This is standard practice in extradition cases and is the first step in the removal process."

Assange told the BBC News that he did not plan to comply.
"Our advice is that asylum law both internationally and domestically takes precedence over extradition law, so almost certainly not," he said.

Assange took refuge in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London last week, seeking political asylum in a last-ditch attempt to evade extradition to Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning on charges of rape and sexual assault.

The 40-year-old Australian was first arrested in London in December 2010 at the request of Swedish prosecutors asking to question him on allegations of sexual abuse committed in Sweden the previous August.

He denies the accusations but has lost a string of appeals in British courts to avoid being handed over to Sweden’s judiciary for questioning. Assange says his chief fear is that this would lead to further extradition to the United States, where he could face trial for WikiLeaks’ actions.

He was under house arrest with an order to present himself daily to the nearest police station when he broke bail and took refuge in the Ecuadorean Embassy.

Assange is supported by WikiLeaks fans who in the past appeared at Assange’s every public appearance with banners saying “Free Assange, Free Bradley Manning,” the latter a reference to the U.S. Army analyst who awaits trial in the United States on charges of releasing the original discs with the official documents published by WikiLeaks.



Updated : 2020-12-04 23:23 GMT+08:00