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Romney: Obama wrong to politicize bin Laden raid

 Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney gestures as he speaks at the state fishing pier, Monday, April 30, 2012, in ...
 A man gives a thumb up as Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney greets supporters at the Portsmouth Fish Pier in P...

Romney 2012

Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney gestures as he speaks at the state fishing pier, Monday, April 30, 2012, in ...

Romney 2012

A man gives a thumb up as Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney greets supporters at the Portsmouth Fish Pier in P...

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney said on Tuesday that President Barack Obama should refrain from making the killing of al-Qaida chief Osama bin Laden a "politically divisive event."
Romney acknowledged that Obama has a right to take credit for ordering the mission that killed bin Laden in Pakistan a year ago. But he said Obama was wrong to suggest Romney would not have ordered the raid, saying "Of course I would have."
The former Massachusetts governor said he found it "very disappointing for the president to try to make this a political item" by suggesting he wouldn't have ordered the raid. "Of course I would have," Romney said.
Romney told CBS television that he and Obama had plenty of issues to dispute beyond anti-terrorism strategy.
Obama ordered the Navy SEAL raid on bin Laden's hideout deep in Pakistan one year ago. Over the weekend, Robert Gibbs, formerly Obama's spokesman and now a top campaign official, said it was unclear whether Romney would have ordered the killing of bin Laden.
"I think trying to attack me on that basis is inappropriate and the wrong course," Romney said.
He made the comments shortly after the Obama camp released a television ad accusing Romney of sending U.S. jobs overseas and keeping his money in Swiss accounts.
The Obama ad is partly in response to one released last week by the conservative political group Americans for Prosperity, which suggests money from Obama's $814 billion economic stimulus package went to overseas green-energy companies. Congress passed Obama's massive spending measure in hopes of pulling the U.S. economy out of the worst downturn since the 1930s Great Depression.
The economy is by far the biggest issue in the election, and Romney, who has seemingly locked up the nomination to challenge Obama in November, continues to attack the president on the issue.
The Obama campaign was spending about $780,000 to place the ad in battleground states Virginia, Ohio and Iowa, accuses. It accuses Romney of having "shipped American jobs to places like Mexico and China" when he led the investment firm Bain Capital. It also says Romney "outsourced state jobs to a call center in India" when he was governor of Massachusetts.
"It's just what you'd expect from a guy who had a Swiss bank account," the Obama ad says, referring to Romney's 2010 income tax filing that showed some family money is kept in accounts abroad. Romney's fortune is estimated to be as much as $250 million.
As the presidential race moves toward full speed, Romney was appearing Tuesday in New York City with firefighters and former Mayor Rudy Giuliani to mark the one-year anniversary of the killing of bin Laden, who was responsible for the 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
Republican contender Newt Gingrich, meanwhile, released a video on his website saying he would formally end his campaign Wednesday. The former House speaker, who has been out of the running for weeks, thanked supporters and said he would continue working to defeat Obama, saying the president's re-election would be a "genuine disaster" for the country. Gingrich did not, however, mention throwing his support to Romney.


Updated : 2021-04-19 17:11 GMT+08:00