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Taiwan neither 'worst place to be female' nor best

Taiwan neither 'worst place to be female' nor best

Washington, April 30 (CNA) Compared with their counterparts in developed North American and European countries, women in Taiwan still suffer from a certain degree of gender discrimination in many fields, including education, according to a recently published U.S. study on "the worst place to be a woman." Published in the April 24 edition of Foreign Policy magazine, the study, authored by Valerie M. Hudson of Texas A&M University, features the current status of women worldwide in nine categories, including discrepancy in education, inequity in family law and practice, and government participation by women. Other categories are child marriage for girls in terms of practice and law, maternal mortality, women's physical security, polygyny, son preference and gender ratios, and trafficking in women. The survey indicates that Taiwanese women are not well-favored in most of the categories. On the scale of education discrepancy, which shows the degree of difference between boys' and girls' enrollment in secondary education, as well as whether there are any areas of study that are restricted for girls, the largest gap is in Central Africa, which has a more-than 20 percent degree of difference between male and female secondary education levels. Taiwan falls in the 11 to 15 percent bracket in terms of legal or cultural educational restrictions for females, while countries in North America and West Europe are listed in the less-than 5 percent bracket, as there are no such restrictions on girls there, according to the study. The study also found that Taiwan, like China, has a family law that "is somewhat inequitable, and those laws that are equitable may not be enforced," while North American and West European countries have family laws that are "equitable between men and women, and the law is respected." In terms of government participation, less than 15 percent of parliamentary seats are held by women in Taiwan, while the percentage reaches over 30 percent in North American and West European countries. Taiwan is also listed as a country in which women have low levels of physical security. In the category of son preference and gender ratios, Taiwan and China are both regarded as having extremely abnormal gender ratios, with males heavily favored, the study shows. Foreign Policy, a magazine of global politics, economics and ideas, is published by the Slate Group, a division of The Washington Post. (By Chou Yung-chieh and Elizabeth Hsu)


Updated : 2021-04-18 08:47 GMT+08:00