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Women feel more discriminated against in workplace than men: poll

Women feel more discriminated against in workplace than men: poll

Taipei, March 5 (CNA) More female than male workers in Taiwan feel they have suffered discrimination in the workplace because of their gender, according to the results of a poll released Monday. The results of the poll, conducted by the Council of Labor Affairs, show that 5 percent of female respondents feel their gender has negatively affected their earning potential, while only 0.8 percent of male respondents had the same feeling. Furthermore, 3.7 percent of the female respondents feel their gender works against them in terms of job promotions, compared to 1.5 percent of male workers who feel that way. The three areas in which the female respondents said they feel most discrimination were pay raises, job searches and job promotion, while among the male respondents, they were job assignments, job searches, promotions and employee benefits. The poll results show that more women than men feel mistreated in the workplace because of their gender in all eight categories surveyed, which also included performance appraisal, job training and education, and severance, leaving and termination. In addition, 4.9 percent of the females polled said they feel they have received unequal treatment upon getting married, higher than the 0.7 percent among the male respondents. Married respondents, regardless of gender, face difficulty when asking for leave, but in addition, married female respondents said they face difficulty when applying for jobs or are forced to transfer to other departments. Furthermore, 5.2 percent of the females polled said they had been mistreated in the workplace after becoming pregnant or giving birth. According to the poll, 30 percent of companies surveyed admitted that they consider potential workers' gender when assigning jobs, 9.7 percent said they have different scales according to gender and 4.4 percent said they take gender into consideration when deciding salary increases. The results also show that the number of female respondents who were sexually harassed in the workplace decreased from 6.4 percent in 2010 to 5.4 percent in 2011, although the number is still 4.5 percentage points higher than that of their male counterparts. In addition, 37.2 percent of the companies polled offered paid family care leave for their employees in 2011 after a revision of the law last year expanded the right to such leave from civil servants to private sector workers. The poll, conducted in November and December last year, collected 3,078 effective samples from companies and 4,002 from workers. (By Christie Chen)


Updated : 2021-03-07 07:51 GMT+08:00