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Tainted beef sold to U.S. office: Taipei health official

Tainted beef sold to U.S. office: Taipei health official

Taipei, March 3 (CNA) Taipei's health department said Saturday a batch of beef that was recently found to contain residues of the banned feed additive ractopamine was sold to the U.S. representative office in Taipei.
Tracing the flow of the beef in which ractopamine, a leanness-enhancing drug banned in Taiwan, was detected earlier this week, the department found 7.48 kilograms of the meat had been sold to the Taipei office of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT). The AIT issued a document backing the safety of U.S. beef with ractopamine residues Thursday as Washington pressed Taiwan to further allow beef imports from the United States, where the drug is allowed as a feed additive. Most of the 249 kilograms of the imported meat was sold to a food company in New York, 80 kilograms of it was later sold to the momo shopping channel, according to the department. Some 54 kilograms of the beef was recalled. The department's inspection was conducted amid public concerns about the drug's potential health risks to humans. Meanwhile, food and health officials from New Taipei, Keelung and Hualien also conducted random checks on restaurants, retailers and wholesalers of U.S. beef. New Taipei health officials checked the kitchens of various restaurants in the Mega City department store and obtained samples for testing. The health department also checked whether steak houses were labeling the source of their beef, said Liu Shu-yu, an inspection official. In Keelung, a supermarket chain and a Japanese restaurant both stopped selling the supplies that were found to be tainted in a January inspection, said local health department. In Hualien, eastern Taiwan, U.S. beef was sold in only two of 40 inspected sellers. Both were able to provide documents to prove their products were free of ractopamine, said the county's health department. Sellers of meat containing the additive could face fines between NT$60,000 to NT$6 million. (By Johnson Sun, Andrew Liu, Claudia Liu, Wang Hong-kuo and Kendra Lin)


Updated : 2021-06-20 19:05 GMT+08:00