Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Taiwan ex-rep in Kansas City leaves US, questioned about maid abuse

Taiwan ex-rep in Kansas City leaves US, questioned about maid abuse

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – Former Taiwan representative in Kansas City Jacqueline Liu arrived home early Wednesday to face questioning by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs over her maid abuse case.
Her deportation from the United States followed her arrest last November 10 on charges of underpaying and overworking Filipino housekeepers while serving as director-general of the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Kansas City, Missouri.
She spent more than two months in detention before a plea bargain was accepted by the court and she was waiting to be deported.
Liu, 65, arrived at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport early Wednesday morning, but refused to talk to reporters. A MOFA vehicle took her home to Taipei’s Beitou District, reports said.
MOFA spokesman James Chang said she visited the ministry in the afternoon to face questioning by a special taskforce. He said the decision whether or not she would be sacked depended on the outcome of the investigation and would be up to Foreign Minister Timothy Yang.
Vice Minister Tung Kuoyu headed the taskforce, while representatives from MOFA’s personnel, accounting and North American Affairs departments would all be present, Chang said. The hearing lasted an estimated two hours, but the ministry was unwilling to reveal any details.
Chang said a visit to the ministry by American Institute in Taiwan Director William Stanton Wednesday afternoon was purely a coincidence and had nothing to do with Liu’s hearing.
Liu was still employed by the ministry, with a decision on her future to follow the MOFA procedure as well as separate investigations by the judiciary and by the Control Yuan, the spokesman said. Her status was that of a representative overseas returning home on business, he added, emphasizing she had not been dismissed from her job.
MOFA would review her case in a fair and equitable manner and complete its investigation as soon as possible, according to Chang.
Liu admitted to the charges one week after her detention, but the plea bargaining process took several weeks, reports said. In late January, the US court forced Liu to pay US$80,044 (NT$2.3 million) in restitution for two Filipino housekeepers she admitted having fraudulently employed and underpaid. The two were certified as victims of a severe form of human trafficking, the court said. Liu also had to pay the full costs of her imprisonment and deportation.
The Taiwanese diplomat signed a contract for a Filipino housekeeper to work 40 hours a week for a US$1,240 (NT$36,500) monthly salary, but instead she only paid the woman US$450 (NT$13,000) a month for 18-hour days and six-and-a-half-day weeks. Liu also monitored the housekeeper with cameras in her home and prevented her leaving home without supervision or permission, reports said.
Liu also admitted she did the same with a previous Filipino employee.


Updated : 2021-10-26 23:52 GMT+08:00