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'Bright' orange will beat 'dark' blue and green: PFP's Lin

'Bright' orange will beat 'dark' blue and green: PFP's Lin

New Delhi, Jan. 8 (CNA) People First Party (PFP) vice presidential candidate Lin Ruey-shiung said Sunday his party's orange logo is the same color as Bhutan's national flag, which he said symbolizes "brightness" that will prevail over blue and green, the colors of the Kuomintang (KMT) and Democratic Progressive Party (DPP). Lin, who departed from Taipei for Bhutan on Jan. 4, made the remarks during a stopover in New Delhi on his way back home. He was scheduled to leave New Delhi Monday and arrive in Taipei in the afternoon. He said half of Bhutan's national flag is orange, and other half is yellow. "Orange means auspiciousness and brightness," unlike the KMT's blue and the DPP's green -- colors that he said were "dark and gloomy." As long as the Taiwanese people decide to choose happiness and march toward brightness, they will gain fortune and many happy years, Lin said. "I will say the same thing when I return to Taiwan," he told CNA. Asked whether he was concerned about his absence from the heated campaign in Taiwan, Lin said the election is about allowing the people to vote for "wise and competent" candidates in a happy mood. "As long as people use their conscience while casting their ballots, I believe we (Lin and PFP Chairman James Soong) will be elected." Soong is fighting an uphill battle against the ruling KMT's incumbent President Ma Ying-jeou and DPP Chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen. "Mr. Soong and I have been campaigning in an easy and light-hearted way, unlike Ma and Tsai who have been yelling and shouting until their voices become hoarse," Lin said. Asked why he failed to meet Bhutan's King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuk while in the Himalayan country, Lin said, "I won't say why he suddenly changed his mind and hid himself until I return to Taiwan." However, Lin met with Bhutan's former Health Minister Gado Tshering, who had invited Lin to visit. Lin, a public health expert, was asked to give advice on how to run the newly established public health department at the Royal University of Bhutan. After getting a firsthand look at Bhutan's health care system, Lin said Taiwan could offer assistance to Bhutan by dispatching medical staff there for three to four months at a time to help serve the needs of the local people. (BY Ho Hung-ju and S.C. Chang)


Updated : 2021-04-18 00:41 GMT+08:00