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Taiwan vice-presidential candidate Lin Ruey-shiung talks about electromagnetic waves

2012 Taiwan vice presidential candidate of the People First Party (PFP) Lin Ruey-shiung.
Kuomintang vice-presidential candidate Premier Wu Den-yih.
Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) vice-presidential candidate Su Jia-chyuan.

PFP Lin Ruey-shiung

2012 Taiwan vice presidential candidate of the People First Party (PFP) Lin Ruey-shiung.

Kuomintang vice-presidential candidate Premier Wu Den-yih.

Su Jia-chyuan

Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) vice-presidential candidate Su Jia-chyuan.

Kuomintang vice-presidential candidate Premier Wu Den-yih, opposition Democratic Progressive Party candidate Su Jia-chyuan and People First Party candidate Lin Ruey-shiung took part in the only televised vice-presidential debate of the campaign Saturday.

Lin had claimed that for three consecutive nights in September, his residence was attacked by electromagnetic waves. When a reporter asked him about the electromagnetic radiation threat, Lin said some residents in Taichung’s Wufeng district told him they were living under high electromagnetic fields, and hoped that the government could take action to protect them from long-term exposure.

Lin criticized wage stagnation in Taiwan under KMT’s and DPP’s ruling. He said his students who graduated 13 years ago earned the same amount as those who graduated this year.

“[KMT’s and DPP’s] government catered to plutocrats,” Lin said. “I feel sorry for the young people now, I think that is why I dared to announce my candidacy.”

When asked about the introduction of a Gross National Happiness (GNH) index, Lin stated that public health and more equal wealth distribution are fundamental elements of happiness. However, the conflict between KMT and DPP causes hazardous antagonistic values, which is the reason why Taiwan has low GNH rates.

As to cross-straits relations, Lin approved of the Economic Cooperation Framework Agreement (ECFA) with China and reaffirmed that there would be harmonious relations between Taiwan and China if the PFP is elected on January 14.

Lin mentioned when SARS broke out in 2003, he went to infected areas in Hong Kong for research regardless of his own safety. He criticized again that then-Mainland Affairs Council chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen banned him from attending a SARS conference in Beijing.

“I have always devoted myself to the public,” Lin said, warning that if Taiwan keeps being trapped in pan-blue and pan-green conflicts, the country will keep regressing.