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Women's right groups unhappy with legislation for red-light zones

Women's right groups unhappy with legislation for red-light zones

Staff Writer with Agencies

Civic organizations advocating the protection of less-privileged women showed mostly disappointment Friday over the passage of an amendment bill regarding the sex trade at the Legislative Yuan that day.
Under the amendments, local governments are allowed to designate districts where the sex trade is permitted. Sex trade outside such special zones, however, will result in a maximum fine of NT$30,000 (US$937) for both the prostitute and her customer.
The amended law “opens the doors for human trafficking rings” to run their businesses, allowing the government to earn tax income from “women’s sexual dignity,” the Anti-Sexual Exploitation Alliance blasted at a press conference it held following the passage of the legislation.
Legislator Huang Sue-ying of the opposition Democratic Progressive Party, who did not vote for the Executive Yuan-proposed amendments earlier in the day, said opening red-light zones is not how the government should help women suffering from financial woes. Instead, it should launch a labor and social welfare policy that takes better care of less-privileged women, she said.
Huang denounced the government as “shameful” for allowing the legalization of prostitution legalized, and approving the sex trade.
The lawmaker, who advocates punishing those who use prostitutes but not the prostitutes, said she “does not wish to see the sex trade turning into a job, or a way to make a living. It’s a burden too heavy for women,” she said.
Meanwhile, Chi Hui-jung, executive director of the Garden of Hope Foundation, called the approved amendments to the Article 80 of the Social Order Maintenance Act, which penalizes sex workers but not their clients, as “a step backward” from international trends, as Holland, which has an open sex trade, is planning to cut the scale of the sex trade districts in Amsterdam in 2012.
The international trend, Chi went on, is to punish those who buy the services of prostitutes, not the prostitutes.
“The best way to reduce the supply is to reduce the demand,” and that strategy could also prevent less-privileged women from being forced to become prostitutes, said the activist from the group devoted to the protection of young girls forced into the sex trade.
Chi urged the government to change its focus from opening red-light zones to helping less-privileged girls and women find proper jobs, freeing them from the financial constraits that force them to become sex workers.


Updated : 2021-05-14 05:51 GMT+08:00