Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Heavy rain moves northeast with Lee's remnants

 Squalls and heavy surf pounds homes along the beach in Dauphin Island, Ala., Monday, Sept.  5, 2011. The heavy waves were breaking under homes, damag...
 Squalls and heavy surf pounds homes along the beach in Dauphin Island, Ala., Monday, Sept.  5, 2011. The heavy waves were breaking under homes, damag...
 Squalls and heavy surf pounds homes along the beach in Dauphin Island, Ala., Monday, Sept.  5, 2011. The heavy waves were breaking under homes, damag...
 A truck drives through flooded streets in the Palm Lake subdivision in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Lee in Slidell, La., Monday, Sept. 5, 2011. (A...
 A man rides his bicycle down a flooded sidewalk in the Palm Lake subdivision in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Lee in Slidell, La., Monday, Sept. 5,...
 A home is shown after a possible tornado moved through the area Monday, Sept. 5, 2011, near Woodstock, Ga.  One person was injured in a possible torn...
 The home of Bob Van Derwart is shown from the inside after a possible tornado moves through the area leaving a Pine tree in his home, Monday, Sept. 5...
 Bob Van Derwart speaks with a roofing contractor after a possible tornado moves through the area leaving a Pine tree in his home, Monday, Sept. 5, 20...
 Ron Bond surveys the damage at Killian Park N Store where more than 80 boats and RVs were destroyed by an apparent tornado in Canton, Ga.  as the rem...
 The home of Bob Van Derwart is shown after a possible tornado moved through the area leaving a Pine tree in his home, Monday, Sept. 5, 2011, near Woo...

APTOPIX Lee

Squalls and heavy surf pounds homes along the beach in Dauphin Island, Ala., Monday, Sept. 5, 2011. The heavy waves were breaking under homes, damag...

Lee

Squalls and heavy surf pounds homes along the beach in Dauphin Island, Ala., Monday, Sept. 5, 2011. The heavy waves were breaking under homes, damag...

Lee

Squalls and heavy surf pounds homes along the beach in Dauphin Island, Ala., Monday, Sept. 5, 2011. The heavy waves were breaking under homes, damag...

Lee

A truck drives through flooded streets in the Palm Lake subdivision in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Lee in Slidell, La., Monday, Sept. 5, 2011. (A...

Lee

A man rides his bicycle down a flooded sidewalk in the Palm Lake subdivision in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Lee in Slidell, La., Monday, Sept. 5,...

Lee Georgia

A home is shown after a possible tornado moved through the area Monday, Sept. 5, 2011, near Woodstock, Ga. One person was injured in a possible torn...

Lee Georgia

The home of Bob Van Derwart is shown from the inside after a possible tornado moves through the area leaving a Pine tree in his home, Monday, Sept. 5...

Lee Georgia

Bob Van Derwart speaks with a roofing contractor after a possible tornado moves through the area leaving a Pine tree in his home, Monday, Sept. 5, 20...

Lee Georgia

Ron Bond surveys the damage at Killian Park N Store where more than 80 boats and RVs were destroyed by an apparent tornado in Canton, Ga. as the rem...

Lee Georgia

The home of Bob Van Derwart is shown after a possible tornado moved through the area leaving a Pine tree in his home, Monday, Sept. 5, 2011, near Woo...

Heavy rain from the former Tropical Storm Lee rolled northeast through the United States on Tuesday, spreading the threat of flooding, spawning tornadoes, sweeping several people away and knocking out power to thousands.
At least four people died because of the rough winds and drenching rains.
Lee also churned up heavy surf that sent tar balls washing onto Alabama's prime tourist beaches. The globs of oil found so far were very small, Orange Beach Mayor Tony Kennon said, and their origin was unclear.
Oil from a massive BP spill last year had soiled Gulf Coast beaches during the summer tourist season.
Meanwhile, more rain was expected in parts of Tennessee that already saw precipitation records fall on Labor Day.
Tornado watches covered much of North and South Carolina and flooding was forecast along the upper Potomac River and some of its tributaries in West Virginia and western Maryland.
Flood watches and warnings were in effect from northeast Alabama and Tennessee through West Virginia to upstate New York, already soaked by Irene.
Rainfall amounts of up to 10 inches (25.4 centimeters) were possible as heavy rain spread into the central Appalachians, the National Weather Service's Hydrometeorological Prediction Center said.
In Georgia, officials at Fort Stewart said a lightning strike sent about 22 soldiers to the hospital Monday, with at least three kept overnight.
Chainsaws and blue tarps were coming out in Georgia neighborhoods hit by suspected twisters that ripped off siding and shingles and sent trees crashing through roofs.
Lee's center came ashore Sunday in Louisiana, dumping up to 12 inches (30 centimeters) of rain in parts of New Orleans and other areas. Despite some street flooding, officials said New Orleans' 24-pump flood control system was doing its job.
___
Mohr reported from Jackson, Mississippi. Associated Press writers Jay Reeves in Orange Beach, Alabama, and Randall Dickerson in Nashville, Tennessee, contributed to this report.


Updated : 2021-05-08 22:54 GMT+08:00