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Poll shows Japan leader's popularity recovering

 Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan arrives at his official residence in Tokyo Wednesday, March 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Yomiuri Shimbun, Hidetoshi Tanaka) J...
 Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan bows after giving a speech at a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo Friday, March 25, 2011, two week...
 Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan speaks during a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo Friday, March 25, 2011, two weeks after a catast...

Japan Earthquake

Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan arrives at his official residence in Tokyo Wednesday, March 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Yomiuri Shimbun, Hidetoshi Tanaka) J...

Japan Earthquake

Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan bows after giving a speech at a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo Friday, March 25, 2011, two week...

Japan Earthquake

Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan speaks during a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo Friday, March 25, 2011, two weeks after a catast...

Public support for Japan's prime minister is recovering as his administration tackles natural and nuclear disasters, a poll released Sunday showed.
The survey by Kyodo News agency found approval of Prime Minister Naoto Kan and his Cabinet rose to 28.3 percent after sinking below 20 percent in February.
The dismal approval of Kan last month led to speculation he could be forced out of office; he already is Japan's fifth leader in four years. While the latest figure is still low, it suggests he is making some gains with voters.
About 58 percent of respondents in the nationwide survey conducted Saturday and Sunday said they approved of the government's handling of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, but a similar number criticized its handling of the ongoing crisis at a crippled nuclear plant.
More than 10,600 deaths from the earthquake and tsunami have been confirmed, and the toll is expected to top 18,000. More than 240,000 people are living in evacuation centers.
Workers have raced to cool nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant that has leaked radiation since the tsunami damaged its cooling equipment.
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano acknowledged Sunday that officials need to do a better job communicating information about the nuclear crisis to the public.
The government is working to "release detailed information in a timely fashion, as well as explaining the meaning of data so that it is easy to understand," he said on national broadcast NHK.
More than two-thirds of respondents said they would support a temporary tax hike to help pay for rehabilitation efforts.
Edano said a vision for recovery must be crafted before considering any tax measures. "Once we do that, then we can start seriously thinking about funds," he said.
Kyodo said it surveyed 1,011 randomly selected eligible voters by telephone on Saturday and Sunday. It did not give a margin of error. Polls of that size would generally have a margin of error of about 5 percentage points.


Updated : 2021-10-26 14:47 GMT+08:00