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Developments in Japan's disasters, nuclear crisis

Developments in Japan's disasters, nuclear crisis

_ HUGE JUMP IN RADIATION INSIDE STRICKEN NUCLEAR PLANT. Radioactivity in contaminated water in one reactor unit at a damaged Japanese nuclear power plant tested 10 million times higher than normal, forcing the evacuation of workers and again delaying efforts to bring the complex under control, the plant's operator says. The air in Unit 2, meanwhile, measured 1,000 millisieverts per hour _ four times the limit of 250 millisieverts deemed safe by the government, Tokyo Electric Power Co. spokesman Takashi Kurita says. TEPCO is struggling to pump the contaminated water from four troubled units at the overheated Fukushima Dai-ichi plant. Japan's nuclear safety agency had warned Saturday that radioactivity inside the units was rising fast and that extracting the radioactive water was a priority. This has been a major setback in the urgent mission to get the plant's crucial cooling system back up and operating more than two weeks after the massive earthquake and tsunami.
_ DEATH TOLL NEARS 10,500. The official death toll from the disaster stands at 10,489, with more than 16,620 people listed as missing, police say. The final death toll is expected to surpass 18,000.
_ TINY AMOUNTS OF RADIATION FROM JAPAN REACH NEVADA. Minuscule amounts of radiation from Japan's damaged nuclear plant have reached Las Vegas, but scientists say it poses no health risk. Extremely small amounts of the radioactive isotopes iodine-131 and xenon-133 reached a monitoring station by the city's Atomic Testing Museum this week, says Ted Hartwell, manager of the Desert Research Institute's Community Environmental Monitoring Program. Hartwell says he's certain the isotopes came from Japan because they're not usually detected in Nevada. But he says the readings were far below levels that could pose any health risks.
_ FORD TO IDLE BELGIAN PLANT FOR 5 DAYS. Ford Motor Co. says it will idle an auto plant in Belgium for five days, trying to conserve supplies of Japanese parts that could run low following the earthquake and tsunami. Ford spokesman Todd Nissen says the plant in Genk will close beginning April 4. The company had planned to idle the plant in May for another reason. But it moved up the date after auto parts suppliers in Japan were damaged by the twin disaster on March 11. Ford makes Mondeo sedans and Galaxy and S-Max minivans at the Belgian plant.


Updated : 2021-10-26 11:32 GMT+08:00