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UN civilian lead in Afghanistan wins support

UN civilian lead in Afghanistan wins support

The Security Council gave strong backing Tuesday to the United Nations taking the lead in international civilian efforts in Afghanistan as the country starts assuming responsibility for its own security and development.
A resolution extending the mandate of the U.N.'s political mission in Afghanistan until March 23, 2012, was adopted unanimously by the U.N.'s most powerful body.
The Security Council stressed the importance of a comprehensive approach to address the challenges to a successful transition to Afghan security leadership beginning in early 2011.
It emphasized that security gains must be supported by improvements in the way the country is governed and in the living standards of the Afghan people.
"Afghanistan's peaceful future lies in the building of a stable, secure, economically self-sufficient state, free of terrorism and narcotics and based on strengthened democratic institutions, respect for the separation of powers, reinforced constitutional checks and balances and the guarantee and enforcement of citizens' rights and obligations," the council said.
The council condemned "in the strongest terms" all attacks targeting civilians and Afghan and international forces.
It expressed serious concern at the continuing "alarming threats" posed by the Taliban, al-Qaida, and other extremist groups and the "harmful consequences" of these activities on the Afghan government's ability to provide security, guarantee the rule of law, provide basic services and ensure the human rights of the Afghan people.
The U.N. Assistance Mission in Afghanistan, known as UNAMA, has some 1,500 staff _ about 80 percent Afghans _ operating in 18 regional and provincial offices across the country and in liaison offices in neighboring Islamabad and Tehran.
The Security Council called on UNAMA to "continue to lead the international civilian efforts" in supporting the Afghan government's National Priority Programs covering security, governance, justice and economic and social development, and coordinating and cooperating with international donors and organizations and civilian representatives of the international military forces.
The council welcomed "the renewed efforts of the Afghan government ... to promote dialogue with those elements in opposition to the government who are ready to renounce violence, break ties with al-Qaida and other terrorist organizations, denounce terrorism and accept the Afghan Constitution, particularly as it relates to gender and human rights issues."
It stressed UNAMA's role in supporting peace and reconciliation and encouraged the Afghan government "to make use of UNAMA's good offices to support this process as appropriate."
Afghanistan's U.N. Ambassador Zahir Tanin called the resolution "an important step," saying that "as Afghanistan embarks on the process of transition, the role of the U.N. remains crucial in the years to come."
He said the council's call for more focused and coordinated U.N. action "is in line with the transition to Afghan ownership and leadership" of the country's future.


Updated : 2020-12-05 07:57 GMT+08:00