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Gov't shutdown averted as US House votes $4B cuts

 Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, stands by himself after emerging from the Democrat's weekly policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 1,...
 Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid, D- Nev., talks to the media after a Democratic policy luncheon on Tuesday, March 1, 2011, in Washington.  (AP...
 Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo. looks on at left as Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., talks to the media on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, March 1,...
 Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid, D- Nev., talks to the media after a Democratic policy luncheon on Tuesday, March 1, 2011, in Washington.  (AP...

Congress Policy Lunches

Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, stands by himself after emerging from the Democrat's weekly policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 1,...

APTOPIX Congress Policy Lunches

Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid, D- Nev., talks to the media after a Democratic policy luncheon on Tuesday, March 1, 2011, in Washington. (AP...

Congress Policy Lunches

Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo. looks on at left as Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., talks to the media on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, March 1,...

Congress Policy Lunches

Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid, D- Nev., talks to the media after a Democratic policy luncheon on Tuesday, March 1, 2011, in Washington. (AP...

The U.S. House of Representatives passed emergency short-term legislation Tuesday to cut federal spending by $4 billion and avert a government shutdown. Senate Democrats agreed to follow suit, handing Republicans an early victory in their drive to rein in government spending.
The bill that cleared the House on a bipartisan vote of 335-91 eliminates the threat of a shutdown on March 4, when existing spending authority expires. At the same time, it creates a compressed two-week time frame for the White House and lawmakers to engage in what looms as a highly contentious negotiation on a follow-up bill to set spending levels through the Sept. 30 end of the current budget year.
The Senate set a vote on the short-term measure for Wednesday morning, the final step before it goes to President Barack Obama for his signature. "We'll pass this and then look at funding the government on a long-term basis," said Sen. Harry Reid, leader of the Senate's majority Democrats.
The White House, which earlier in the day urged an interim measure of up to five weeks, stopped short of saying the president would sign the legislation.
"The President is encouraged by the progress Congress is making towards a short-term agreement," the president's spokesman, Jay Carney, said. "Moving forward, the focus needs to be on both sides finding common ground in order to reach a long-term solution that removes the kind of uncertainty that can hurt the economy and job creation."
House Republicans were more eager to draw attention to the bill that was passing with the acquiescence of the White House and Democrats than to the challenge still ahead.
"Now that congressional Democrats and the administration have expressed an openness for spending cuts, the momentum is there for a long-term measure that starts to finally get our fiscal house in order," said Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia.
"Changing the culture of borrowing and spending in Washington is no small feat, but I am heartened by today's action and it shows that Republicans have started to make the meaningful changes that voters called for in the last election."
Republicans won control of the House and gained seats in the Senate last fall with the backing of tea party activists demanding deep cuts in spending and other steps to reduce the size of the federal government.
On the floor of the House of Representatives, Democrats sharply attacked Republicans in the run-up to the vote, but much of their criticism was aimed at an earlier $61 billion package of spending cuts that had cleared on a party-line vote.
When it came time to vote, Democrats split, 104 in favor and 85 against.
Republicans voted 231-6 in favor.


Updated : 2021-10-17 23:26 GMT+08:00