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Contador says he will appeal any doping suspension

 File - In his Sept. 30, 2010, file photo cyclist Alberto Contador reacts during a news conference in Pinto,  on the outskirts of Madrid, Spain.  Span...
 FILE - In this July 25, 2010 file photo, Alberto Contador of Spain speeds down the Champs Elysees during the 20th and last stage of the Tour de Franc...
 File - In this file photo from Oct. 30, 2010, cyclist Alberto Contador of Spain speaks on a cell phone in Oviedo, Spain. Spanish cycling officials ha...

Spain Cycling Doping Contador

File - In his Sept. 30, 2010, file photo cyclist Alberto Contador reacts during a news conference in Pinto, on the outskirts of Madrid, Spain. Span...

Spain Cycling Doping Contador

FILE - In this July 25, 2010 file photo, Alberto Contador of Spain speeds down the Champs Elysees during the 20th and last stage of the Tour de Franc...

Spain Cycling Doping Contador

File - In this file photo from Oct. 30, 2010, cyclist Alberto Contador of Spain speaks on a cell phone in Oviedo, Spain. Spanish cycling officials ha...

Alberto Contador plans to appeal any suspension for his Tour de France doping test, saying Friday he feels like "a victim of the system."
"I will defend my innocence until the end," the Spanish rider said at a news conference in Mallorca, two days after Spanish cycling officials proposed a one-year ban for his positive clenbuterol test.
Contador blames the positive test on eating contaminated meat.
The Spanish cycling federation accepted that defense, leading the body to recommend a reduced ban rather than the standard two-year penalty. He would also be stripped of the 2010 Tour title.
"They are recognizing that I'm innocent and then they give me a one-year ban," the three-time Tour winner said. "I can't explain that. I can't defend that. I can't do anything more."
"Of course I feel like a victim _ a victim of the system," he said.
Contador has until Feb. 9 to present further evidence in his defense before a final decision is rendered.
He called the entire disciplinary process "shameful" and said he will do all he can to see that the rule on clenbuterol is changed.
"I'm conscious of the proposed resolution but this is about honor," he said. "What hurts the most is that all of the scientists know I'm innocent. And this hurts me. This is sad. Very sad."


Updated : 2021-04-21 13:57 GMT+08:00