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SAfrica says 'no need to panic' over Mandela

 South African schoolchildren show a get-well sign from their classroom's window at a school adjacent to Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg, South Afric...
 Pupils from a school adjacent to the hospital where former South African President Nelson Mandela, fondly known as "Madiba", is said to be undergoing...
 Students from a school adjacent to the hospital where former South African President Nelson Mandela,  fondly known as "Madiba",  is said to be underg...
 Children from a school adjacent to the hospital where former South African President Nelson Mandela, fondly known as "Madiba" is said to be undergoin...
 A young boy peeps through an steel fence displaying 'Get Well' messages to former South African President Nelson Mandela, at a school adjacent to the...
 A security officer stands at the main entrance of the Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa, Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, where former South Afr...

South Africa Mandela

South African schoolchildren show a get-well sign from their classroom's window at a school adjacent to Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg, South Afric...

South Africa Mandela

Pupils from a school adjacent to the hospital where former South African President Nelson Mandela, fondly known as "Madiba", is said to be undergoing...

South Africa Mandela

Students from a school adjacent to the hospital where former South African President Nelson Mandela, fondly known as "Madiba", is said to be underg...

South Africa Mandela

Children from a school adjacent to the hospital where former South African President Nelson Mandela, fondly known as "Madiba" is said to be undergoin...

South Africa Mandela

A young boy peeps through an steel fence displaying 'Get Well' messages to former South African President Nelson Mandela, at a school adjacent to the...

South Africa Mandela

A security officer stands at the main entrance of the Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa, Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, where former South Afr...

Anti-apartheid icon Nelson Mandela has spent a second night in a Johannesburg hospital, but the South African government says there is no need to panic.
In a statement late Thursday, Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe offered no specifics on why Mandela was taken to the hospital Wednesday, but said he was undergoing specialized tests.
Motlanthe, who is acting president while President Jacob Zuma attends the World Economic Forum in Switzerland, referred to Mandela's history of respiratory problems. Mandela contracted tuberculosis during his 27 years in prison.
Motlanthe notes "mounting concern" among the public about Mandela's health, but says, "Medically there is no need to panic."
Motlanthe is scheduled to brief reporters on Mandela's health later Friday.