Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Putin: Russian secret services don't kill traitors

 Russia's Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, left, listens to a question during a call-in session broadcast live Thursday, Dec. 16, 2010, on Russian state...

Russia Putin

Russia's Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, left, listens to a question during a call-in session broadcast live Thursday, Dec. 16, 2010, on Russian state...

Russia's Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said Thursday that the nation's special services had abandoned a Soviet-era practice of killing turncoats.
Responding to a question if he ever had ordered special services to kill traitors, Putin said during a live call-in session on state television and radio that such practice ended with the Soviet Union.
"Russia's special services don't do that (kill traitors)," he said. "As for the traitors, they will croak themselves. Whatever equivalent of 30 pieces of silver they get, it will get stuck in their throats."
Putin also said Thursday that the 10 Russian sleeper spies who were arrested in the United States this summer were betrayed by a fellow intelligence officer.
"Those people sacrificed their lives to serve the Motherland, and there happened to be an animal who betrayed them," Putin said. "How will he live with it all his life, how will he look his children in the eye? Swine!"
Putin has met and sang patriotic songs with the 10 agents who returned home in early July after a spy swap shortly after their arrest, and he again praised them Thursday.
The spies received a hero's welcome when they returned to Russia in July following a spy swap and Putin led them in a patriotic singalong. President Dmitry Medvedev bestowed them with the nation's highest awards in October.
Anna Chapman, the pinup girl for the agents, later visited the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for the launch of a Russian spaceship, fueling her celebrity in Russia and abroad. She also became the new celebrity face of a Moscow bank.
Putin, a KGB veteran who led the Russian spy agency before ascending to presidency in 2000, insisted in a recent CNN interview that the agents had incurred no damage to the United States.
Russian officials in the past have issued similar denials that the nation's special services are engaged in killing turncoats.
Alexander Litvinenko, a former KGB officer turned Kremlin critic who died in London in 2006 after ingesting radioactive polonium, blamed Putin for the poisoning, but Russia has rejected his accusations. Moscow has dismissed the British demand to extradite the main suspect in the case, former KGB officer Andrei Lugovoi.
Russian security services also denied involvement when a former separatist president of Chechnya, Zelimkhan Yandarbiyev, was killed in a bomb explosion in Qatar in 2004, but two Russian intelligence agents were convicted in Qatar and later returned to Russia.


Updated : 2022-01-21 11:00 GMT+08:00

"