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French anti-doping keen to ease tensions with UCI

French anti-doping keen to ease tensions with UCI

The French Anti-Doping Agency has taken a step toward reconciliation with the International Cycling Union by pledging to work more closely with the governing body in the fight against doping.
The AFLD and the UCI have been at loggerheads in recent years. The AFLD's former president, Pierre Bordry, was critical of the UCI's anti-doping program, and the UCI cut the AFLD out of this year's testing at the Tour de France.
The AFLD was allowed to do supplementary tests on this year's Tour only after the World Anti-Doping Agency intervened.
Under new president Bruno Genevois, the AFLD says that both parties would be better off working together next season in French races such as the Tour, Paris-Nice and the Dauphine Libere.
"The AFLD is willing to join its efforts with those deployed by the International Cycling Union, as much before as during the events," the AFLD said on its website Tuesday.
When publishing its 2010 Tour report last week, WADA praised the UCI's efforts at this year's Tour, but said improvements could be made in testing and in being less rider-friendly.
The AFLD said it agreed with WADA's recommendations, in particular the suggestion that results from riders' biological passports should lead to more targeted testing.
WADA's report also said the UCI should work more harmoniously with the AFLD given its track record in catching 2006 Tour champion Floyd Landis, and in uncovering the widespread use of CERA _ an advanced form of the blood booster EPO.
Bordry and UCI president Pat McQuaid fell out when they worked together during the 2009 Tour. Bordry has since resigned and was replaced by Genevois.
Alberto Contador won the Tour for the third time this year, but the Spaniard has since been provisionally suspended by the UCI after testing positive for the banned drug clenbuterol and he could lose his title.
Contador claims the traces of the clenbuterol were from contaminated steak. He also denied that tests found traces of plastic residues indicating he might have undergone banned blood transfusions.
The Tour has been rocked by other doping scandals in the past.
The American rider Landis was stripped of his title after testing positive for testosterone, and the CERA tests pioneered by Bordry's AFLD led to several riders being caught doping at the 2008 Tour.
Among those was mountain-climbing specialist Bernhard Kohl of Austria, who has since been working with officials to highlight doping in cycling.


Updated : 2021-10-25 03:43 GMT+08:00