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Taiwan fails in U.N. `Memory of World' bid

Taiwan fails in U.N. `Memory of World' bid

Paris, Sept. 10 (CNA) The United Nations has rejected an application by Taiwan to have a collection of oracle bone scripts listed as a world documentary heritage item, a U.N. official said Friday.
The collection, preserved by the Taipei-based Academia Sinica's Institute of History and Philology, was not nominated for inclusion in the "Memory of the World Register" for 2011 because China had already made two submissions, the maximum number allowed by each country, according to Joie Springer, an official at the Secretariat of the Memory of the World Programme.
Taiwan is not recognized as a country by the U.N. and is not a member of the organization.
Springer suggested that Taiwan could consider making a joint submission with China in the future.
The program, established by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization in 1992, is aimed at the preservation and dissemination of valuable archive holdings and library collections worldwide.
Every even-numbered year, the program accepts up to two submissions from each country. The program's International Advisory Committee (IAC) then meets the following year to decide on the new items to be included on the register.
The next IAC meeting is scheduled for 2011, which means that new submissions will not be accepted until 2012.
The two submissions by China that have been nominated for inclusion in 2011 are Ben Cao Gang Mu (Compendium of Materia Medica) and Huang Di Nei Jing (Yellow Emperor's Inner Canon).
National Cultural Association Secretary-General Yang Du said in Taipei that he was surprised Taiwan's submission was not nominated this year.
On the suggestion of making a joint submission with China, Yang said the issue would require careful deliberation in light of the sensitive nature of cross-Taiwan Strait relations.
Meanwhile, Huang Chin-shing, director of the Academia Sinica's Institute of History and Philology, expressed regret over the outcome, which he blamed on China's obstruction.
The oracle bone scripts are ancient Chinese characters inscribed on oracle bones -- animal bones or turtle shells used in divination in China between 1400 B.C and 1100 B.C. The writing is considered a forerunner to modern Chinese characters.
To date, about 5,000 oracle bone characters have been identified, although only 1,500 of them are recognizable. The Academia Sinica holds the world's largest collection of oracle bone scripts.
(By Lo Yuan-shao and Y.F. Low)




Updated : 2021-08-05 22:39 GMT+08:00