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Talk of the day -- Shockwaves from judges' corruption case

Talk of the day -- Shockwaves from judges' corruption case

The Judicial Yuan issued a statement Saturday saying Judicial Yuan President Lai In-jaw had tendered his resignation to President Ma Ying-jeou to take political responsibility for the involvement of three senior judges in a collective bribery case.
In the high-profile corruption case, the three judges and a prosecutor are suspected of having taken bribes while handling a corruption case against former ruling Kuomintang Legislator Ho Chih-hui, who also once served as Miaoli County magistrate.
Local media reports said Lai and Taiwan High Court President Huang Shui-tong originally intended to take advantage of the detention of the three high court judges to clean up judicial ranks and accelerate judicial reform.
However, pressure on Lai and Huang to resign continued to build from inside the judiciary and society at large, forcing both men to step down from their posts to assume political responsibility for the worst corruption scandal in Taiwan's judicial history.
The following are excerpts from local media coverage of the issue: United Daily News: Lai said in his resignation letter sent to President Ma that he had to step down to take the blame for the corruption scandal because the incident has seriously tarnished the judiciary's image and reputation.
He was also quoted as saying that he has often been troubled by dealing with judicial personnel issues during the two years and nine months he has served as president of the Judicial Yuan, which oversees judiciary discipline and court operations.
Judicial Yuan sources said Lai originally intended to turn the crisis resulting from the scandal into an opportunity to streamline judiciary discipline. He first ordered his deputy, Hsieh Tsai-chuan, to form a special task force to draft reform measures within two months.
However, Lai changed his mind and decided to resign from his post after a marathon six-hour internal meeting during which senior court officials reportedly were highly critical of the Judicial Yuan leadership's long-time inaction in promoting judicial reform.
Under pressure from inside and outside, Hsieh and Huang have also offered to resign along with Lai.
President Ma is expected to decide on whether to accept Lai's resignation after a meeting with Lai Sunday. (July 18, 2010).
China Times: Legislators were divided on Lai's decision to resign over the judiciary corruption scandal.
Ruling Kuomintang Legislator Hsieh Kuo-liang said Lai should have stayed on to carry out judicial reform initiatives rather than step down at this critical moment.
Another KMT lawmaker, Lin Chang-min, echoed Hsieh's views, saying only High Court President Huang needed to step down to take political responsibility for the case, while Lai should remain in office and discuss ways to clean up Taiwan's judicial ranks with private judicial reform advocacy groups.
But opposition Democratic Progressive Party Legislator Ker Chien-ming said his party respected Lai's decision to resign because he has been unable to take effective steps to complete anticipated judicial reforms, including promoting a draft Judges Act that would make it possible to phase out unqualified and unsuitable judges.
Meanwhile, State Public Prosecutor General Huang Shih-ming reaffirmed his commitment Saturday to get to the bottom of the judges corruption case, saying that judicial authorities are the last defense of social justice. (July 18, 2010).
(By Sofia Wu)




Updated : 2021-03-05 02:50 GMT+08:00