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Minor earthquake shakes US capital city

Minor earthquake shakes US capital city

A minor earthquake shook residents awake in the Washington, D.C., area early Friday, rattling windows but apparently causing no serious damage.
And while residents of more quake-prone areas might scoff at the 3.6 magnitude temblor, Susan Potter, a geophysicist at the U.S. Geological Survey, said it was the strongest to hit within 30 miles (50 kilometers) of the U.S. capital city since they began keeping records.
The quake hit at 5:04 a.m. EDT and was centered in the Rockville, Maryland, area, said Randy Baldwin, a geophysicist with Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center.
President Barack Obama told reporters he did not feel it.
Baldwin said aftershocks could occur over the next couple days, but none had yet been reported. He said the aftershocks are generally of a smaller magnitude than the initial earthquake.
Police in Washington and in nearby Montgomery County, Maryland, said there were no immediate reports of injuries or damage.
On the U.S. Geological Survey's website, nearly 13,000 people reported feeling the quake, some from as far away as the states of Pennsylvania and West Virginia.
The Washington area has had small, infrequent earthquakes over the years, including a 2.5-magnitude quake in 1997 that was within 25 to 30 miles (40 to 50 kilometers) of Friday's quake and a 2.3-magnitude quake in 1996 that was within 15 miles (25 kilometers), Baldwin said.
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Associated Press writers Matt Small and Jessica Gresko contributed to this report.


Updated : 2020-12-05 23:43 GMT+08:00