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Books act as travel guides for Web's dangerous bogs

Books act as travel guides for Web's dangerous bogs

Many of us now live virtual second lives through social media and within the online space of the Internet. We have "friends" we've never seen - or haven't seen since junior high school.
In addition to providing a mostly pleasant way to interact with these acquaintances without actually being in the same physical space, it's also a fertile ground for business and, unfortunately, mischief too.
Here are two recent books that look at ways one can make friends and money through social networking, and strategies for protection if and when things get too nasty.
"Power Friending: Demystifying Social Media to Grow Your Business" by Amber Mac; Portfolio.
Amber Mac is a virtual Swiss Army Knife of networking; she displays an endless amount of enthusiasm and energy that nearly crackles off the page.
More importantly, she demonstrates a deep and practical understanding of the necessity of extending one's personal and professional presence online.
It's equally mandatory, she argues, for companies even if they're B-to-B operations and don't necessarily require recognition or interaction with consumers.
For the uninitiated, Mac does a very good job of explaining how the online world works in a mostly jargon-free and comprehensible manner. Her prose is clear and upbeat, and though she explains things in detail, with examples and asides, she doesn't get bogged down in minutiae or any overly technical stuff. Much of her material goes beyond the promise of the title; the friending extends to blogs, forums, podcasts, vodcasts and more.
She also offers critiques of failed endeavors by big companies seeking to simulate and stimulate online virility, a dicey proposition, at best, and one that usually achieves the opposite of what was intended.
Overall, she packs quite a bit into this little book, so if you're trying to figure out if using Twitter or being on Facebook is worth your while (it probably is), Ms. Mac will gladly be your guru.
"Wild West 2.0: How to Protect and Restore Your Online Reputation on the Untamed Social Frontier" by Michael Fertik and David Thompson; Amacom.
The online world can be a dangerous place, according to Fertik and Thompson, so they use the metaphor of the Wild West (a largely fictional creation, incidentally) to convey the lawless, anarchic environment. They spend most of the book detailing the ways that one's online reputation can be sullied or impugned by malicious or mistaken perpetrators. Companies and other organizations can also be the victims of these attacks.


Updated : 2021-08-03 08:34 GMT+08:00